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What would you use to erase data?


johndrew
Resolved

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It would appear that technology is outstripping tools designed to safeguard data on HDDs when the PC and/or HDD changes hands. Although the data many of us have is not likely to cause an international furore if lost it may be very uncomfortable on a personal basis.

Apparently much sanitising software can now be reversed and the drive content read. Does this concern you?

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lotvic

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Can't see the point in just denting the casing, it is the disc inside that needs destroying.

I unscrew/prise open unwanted HDDs and destroy the shiny disc (it looks like a cd/dvd disc) I put it between two pieces of cardboard and then smash it with a lump hammer. (the shards are very sharp - you don't want them flying about)

The magnets are very powerful, I have saved some of them waiting to find a use....

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Chegs ®™

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I was amazed to find files still recoverable on a drive I'd formatted to accept linux(wrong partition)then installed a linux OS,then formatted back to NTFS and recovered 100% of the files I'd mistakenly overwritten which all were perfect.I did this with a freeware program so I would imagine that data recovery techniques will've advanced lots as this was some years ago.The Gadget Show did a demo of drive destruction & even one that'd been set on fire still had recoverable data on it,from my memory I think the only drive with totally unrecoverable files was one which had been "dissected" with an acetylene torch.

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johndrew

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Everyday thieves

Such as those reported upon in Nigeria on a TV programme. The collect old PCs and HDDs and spend hours seeing what useful data they are able to get from them. Apparently with some success as bank accounts of previous owners of the hardware have been raided. When questioned many said they had wiped the drives.

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LanceAlot

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DBAN is supposed to irretrievably delete data.

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spuds

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I often wonder when people begin to talk about computer security, and possibly taking hammers to hard drives, when perhaps at the same time, very simple regular security or malaware checks are not taken or even thought about.

Trend Micro have recently stated that using a Java enabled browser can bring security problems through search engine activities, and how criminals can use this to their advantage. Yet how many people are actually aware of this increasing possible problem?.

An article in the latest Computer Active magazine highlights this very problem with "Java leaves PC users in hot water". A remedy for perhaps resolving part of this issue might be found here http://www.computeractive.co.uk/2202858

Perhaps going a little further, I wonder how many people purchase computer systems from liquidation or administration auctions and outlets, possibly as a job-lot purchase, and find masses of information left on hard-drives. I have made a number of purchases from these sources, and the results can be very interesting or alarming, depending on how you want to view the subject of computer security or responsibility?.

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