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Intensive Farming


morddwyd

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Two weeks ago the field opposite was growing a cereal crop.

A week ago it had been combined, the straw was baled and being collected.

Today, having been ploughed and drilled, the field opposite is growing a cereal crop.

It’s been like that, with minor variations in dates for the last twenty years.

Twenty years ago, in the field opposite, we used to see skylarks, partridges, golden plovers, lapwings, curlews, geese, herons, and one year even a peregrine.

Today we don’t even see gulls following the plough.

I wonder if there is a connection?

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oresome

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I did catch a little of a programme the other night describing how city dwelling seagulls knew the location of all the food outlets in their patch that were ripe for scavenging and how they benefitted from street lighting allowing them to seek out food for longer periods.

City gulls will never move to the seaside apparently. We make life too easy for them in the city.

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Aitchbee

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I witnessed a coupla' immigrants delving into the big red waste food-bins outside my local 'big-name' store yesterday...the female (with two babies in a tandem pram (tended by the male) managed to obtain three loaves...they then all crossed over the road and got on the same bus as me.

Glasgow (southside).

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Pine Man

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alan14

I wasn't aware of the waste from restaurants being so high. I was referring to household waste running at about one third of what is purchased. Either way it's an absolute disgrace.

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interzone55

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Pine Man

We do waste a shocking amount of food - not personally, as I try to eat all I buy, which may be why my pants don't fit anymore - probably because there's now far too much choice, and parents are loath to tell their kids what to do.

Another problem is that waste food is no longer sent to farms as pig swill, so it all goes into land fill.

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Aitchbee

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I watched the 'tail-end' of ' Country File ' last night on BBC TV...there was a competition to pick out the best 'natural' photo...one of the photo's [sent in by viewers] was of a lone BADGER making his/her way along a country road in broad daylight...I would suggest that our native wild critters don't like it (...the intensive farming ...one bit!).

The end credits of the same programme superimposed very high nicely arranged aerial photographs/shots of cultivated green ploughed fields...so all is well (I don't think so.)(Can you see, from where, I am a-comin'?)

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Woolwell

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"Another problem is that waste food is no longer sent to farms as pig swill, so it all goes into land fill."

No it doesn't. Some food waste, especially from restaurants and other commercial outlets is sent to anaerobic digestion plants which is then used to generate electricity and bio-fertiliser.

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Woolwell

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Aitchbee - you clearly do not live near the country. Newly ploughed fields are earth coloured not green.

There are many fields that are relatively empty nowadays. Dairy farming is not profitable and there are many fields that are used only for silage or laid aside which used to have cattle grazing.

Contrary to what we are led to believe much of this country is still green.

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morddwyd

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I used to work in a uni hall of residence.

The cooked food the chef was only allowed to keep overnight was vegetables, for vegetable soup the next day.

Whole untouched trays of bacon, bread and butter pudding, cauldrons of soup, joints of meat, and in the summer, when rooms were let to visitors, venison, salmon, all went to waste.

Staff were not allowed to take any home, and portions were carefully planned but there was still enormous waste.

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