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Flight query about cabin pressure


CurlyWhirly
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I have never flown before but am flying to Majorca in October.

My partner (who has flown before) said that on take off I should suck a sweet to avoid a ringing sound in my ears caused by the change of air pressure.

What I can't understand is how the cabin air pressure changes as all planes are airtight ?

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Woolwell

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re the flight times. I suspect that they are giving you local times for take off and landing and the flight times are about the same.

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CurlyWhirly

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CurlyWhirly

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Woolwell, oh right. I did wonder !

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Woolwell

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Just checked and the actual outbound flight time is 2 hrs 40 mins.

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WhiteTruckMan

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Sucking a sweet helps but so does pinching your nose and trying to blow through it.

Yes, but the latter only on the way down, not up!

WTM

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CurlyWhirly

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**"Just checked and the actual outbound flight time is 2 hrs 40 mins" **

How so as the flight departs Bristol at 1800 but doesn't arrive at Majorca until 21.40 that's 3 hs 40 mins not 2 hrs 40 mins ?

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Paddy

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Actually most of the above replies are generally true, but the reason for pressurising the aircraft cabin is that as the aircraft ascends the air gets thinner, therefore less oxygen is available(above 10,000 feet the human body requires suplimentary oxygen) so the aircraft is pressurised to maintain an altitude roughly equivilent to 6,000-7,000ft. The alternative would be to provide everyone on board with oxygen via a mask, this is the reason for providing emergency 'Drop Down' masks to every seat for use in the event of a cabin pressure failure when the aircraft would then make an emergency descent to below 6,000 ft. Enjoy your holiday. Paddy

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carver

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CurlyWhirly you have to take into account local time enter link description here.

At this moment the time in London is 4.20 but in Palma it's 5.20 one hour in front of us, so on the out journey you lose an hour but gain that hour back on the return.

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wee eddie

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And I thought you were going to be talking about Comedy on Radio 4.

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Forum Editor

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WhiteTruckMan

"The reason for this is to reduce stress on the pressurised section of the fusilage."

That's a myth. The fuselage of a modern passenger aircraft is built to withstand cabin pressure changes, and can easily handle the stresses involved. The reason for cabin pressurisation is passenger comfort.

The cabin pressure can fluctuate slightly, but the automatic system setting is for 7000 feet, or around 10.9 psi. Any setting higher than 10,000 feet would cause problems with altitude sickness symptoms, as Woolwell points out.

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