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gas pipes outside the house


WhiteTruckMan
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In case anyone was wondering about the increase in the local moth population, it's because I've finally decided to pry open my wallet and splash out on a new boiler. I've had several quotes, and the one I am most likely to go with has made a novel suggestion that I dont know what to make of that nobody else has, and I thought I would run it by the forum to see what people thought of it.

I need a new gas supply pipe. I'm not disputing this, as they have all told me the same thing. The old one is 15mm, and I need a 22mm pipe. But where it gets inteeresting is that it has been suggested that instead of a somewhat convoluted routing of the new pipe, they simply bore a hole through the outside wall and run the new pipe up the outside of the side of the house then back in at the new boiler.

I've never even heard of this sort of thing being done before, let alone seen it. The side of my house has a driveway, so in theory there is no public access, but I'm concerned about a number of things, namely metal thieves, accidental damage, and weather. Do gas pipes freeze up in winter if above ground?

The fitter said he'd done quite a few like this, with never any problems, but he would say that, wouldnt he? I checked his gas safe card, along with picture, and he's qualified, so it should be legal. But that doesnt necessarily mean it's a good idea.

Has anybody any thoughts or experience in this sort of thing?

WTM

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Forum Editor

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*Fruit Bat /\0/*

"anyone recommend good heaters for kitchen, thinking of the sort that fit under the base units and blow hot air out at floor level"

The one thing (apart from heat) that you want from kickspace heaters is longevity - many of them develop squeaky fans over time.

I recommend Myson kickspace heaters, and if you can it's a good idea to go for the type they call 'hydronic' - heaters that are connected to your heating system, but can also work electrically. The idea is that the heater runs on electricity until the central heating system has had a chance to get going, and then the electrical circuit cuts out automatically.

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WhiteTruckMan

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Lots of interesting comments, information and viewpoints, and thanks to everyone for their contributions.

But just to be clear, there's absolutely NO chance of an exposed, uninsulated gas pipe freezing even in the coldest winter?

WTM

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Forum Editor

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No, there's absolutely no chance of that happening.

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Fruit Bat /\0/\

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Freezing can occur not only when water in the gas stream mixes with temperatures below 32 degrees Fahrenheit, this can happen between the well head and the storage facilities, but it is dried before being passed onto the "Home pipe network" and therefore there is no water vapour in the pipework.

Gases have to pass through the liquid stage to reach a freezing point (unless there is sublimation)

Any substance that is gaseous at normal temperature will have a freezing point at very low temperature, well below what we get in this country, remember it comes through a pipeline from the north of Russia :0) before we see it in Britain.

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Fruit Bat /\0/\

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wiz-king and FE

Thanks for the info, to be honest I am fed up of running pipes, was looking for just an electric fan heater but you may be right probably better to run the pipes now than find its too cold in winter and have to drain it all down to plumb in the extra pipework.

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Forum Editor

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*Fruit Bat /\0/*

Run the pipework in 'Hep' flexible plastic piping. It's much easier in a confined space, and every bit as good, if not better than copper.

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Fruit Bat /\0/\

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Shouldn't be too difficult

Kitchen floor is solid but have move one radiator to back onto a joining wall to kitchen so should just be a matter of drill through the wall at skirting level and teeing off.

Never liked trying to join plastic to copper :0(

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Forum Editor

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Plastic to copper joints couldn't be easier - the push-fit Hep fittings are copper-compatible, and are commonly used in that way in the trade.

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Fruit Bat /\0/\

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Thanks

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