We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. If you continue to use this site, we'll assume you're happy with this. Alternatively, click here to find out how to manage these cookies

hide cookie message
Contact Forum Editor

Send an email to our Forum Editor:


PLEASE NOTE: Your name is used only to let the Forum Editor know who sent the message. Both your name and email address will not be used for any other purpose.

Speakers Corner


It's free to register, to post a question or to start / join a discussion


 

gas pipes outside the house


WhiteTruckMan
Resolved

Likes # 0

In case anyone was wondering about the increase in the local moth population, it's because I've finally decided to pry open my wallet and splash out on a new boiler. I've had several quotes, and the one I am most likely to go with has made a novel suggestion that I dont know what to make of that nobody else has, and I thought I would run it by the forum to see what people thought of it.

I need a new gas supply pipe. I'm not disputing this, as they have all told me the same thing. The old one is 15mm, and I need a 22mm pipe. But where it gets inteeresting is that it has been suggested that instead of a somewhat convoluted routing of the new pipe, they simply bore a hole through the outside wall and run the new pipe up the outside of the side of the house then back in at the new boiler.

I've never even heard of this sort of thing being done before, let alone seen it. The side of my house has a driveway, so in theory there is no public access, but I'm concerned about a number of things, namely metal thieves, accidental damage, and weather. Do gas pipes freeze up in winter if above ground?

The fitter said he'd done quite a few like this, with never any problems, but he would say that, wouldnt he? I checked his gas safe card, along with picture, and he's qualified, so it should be legal. But that doesnt necessarily mean it's a good idea.

Has anybody any thoughts or experience in this sort of thing?

WTM

Like this post
Woolwell

Likes # 0

I've had an external gas pipe to a re-posiitoned combi boiler for several years without any snags at all. However if you have an external condensate drain pipe from the boiler then you need to make sure that it doesn't freeze. Regrettably part of mine does freeze.

Like this post
Fruit Bat /\0/\

Likes # 0

Yes done similar.

Removed old boiler from kitchen and old hot & cold water tanks from airing cupboard. Moved one radiator and changed five.

New Combi Boiler fitted in airing cupboard. Ran new 28mm copper pipe gas supply from meter through wall, up outside wall and back into airing cupboard. Had gas safe man into to connect, test and provide certification.

My neighbours had freezing problems last year with condensate drains 15mm pipe so have 15mm through wall into 28mm on outside which will prevent blockage by freezing.

Just realised that the Kitchen and bedroom above (that used to get really hot) will be affected by the move as no heating in kitchen now boiler is moved and pipes that ran under bedroom floor from tank to boiler are gone, I'll have to turn the radiator on in the bedroom :0)

Next job is replaster and new kitchen, anyone recommend good heaters for kitchen, thinking of the sort that fit under the base units and blow hot air out at floor level

Like this post
oresome

Likes # 0

It seems standard now to run gas pipes and the condensate drain pipe externally.

It does make the house look ugly and I wouldn't like it. The houses were originally built with internal soil pipes, so otherwise have an uncluttered external appearance.

I personally would also avoid a combi boiler, prefering a system boiler with hot water storage tank, allowing the backup of an immersion heater. The boiler itself can be much smaller and the gas supply pipe remain at 15mm.

Like this post
wiz-king

Likes # 0

oresome even with a system using a hot water tank most modern boilers need a 22mm gas pipe to be sure of the initial start-up gas flow.

Like this post
Forum Editor

Likes # 0

ore some

A system boiler will still need at least 22mm for the gas supply pipe - to within a metre of the boiler.

Like this post
Grey Goo

Likes # 0

Woolwell

I am in the process of upgrading, fortunately the gas meter is "under the stairs" I asked the gas guy about freezing condensate pipes and he said they can use a wider bore plastic pipe to minimize the problem.

Like this post
oresome

Likes # 0

Well, I'll have the gas pipe run internally when it has to be replaced following the existing route.

The boiler is around thirty years old, so the time is drawing closer!

I don't expect the overall efficiency, which includes the longevity of the boiler and it's reliability to be improved by replacing it with a new one.

Like this post
Woolwell

Likes # 0

Grey Goo - I've got the wider bore but the installer didn't put enough slope/drain on it on one stretch of about a metre and it freezes. It was a poor installation. I have a work round which is to break the pipe just before the dodgy section. One day I will get it realigned but it has only frozen twice.

Like this post
namtas

Likes # 0

A blocked condensate pipe can damage a boiler.

Like this post
wiz-king

Likes # 0

Fruit Bat /\0/. I have just had one of these fitted in my (tiny) kitchen and it seems to provide a nice gently stream of hot air.

Like this post

Reply to this topic

This thread has been locked.



IDG UK Sites

Android One vs Android Silver vs Google Nexus: What is the difference?

IDG UK Sites

iOS 8 review: Hands on with the iOS 8 beta

IDG UK Sites

Thinking robots: The philosophy of artificial intelligence and evolving technology

IDG UK Sites

How to shoot a robot rom-com in three days