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Could you manage without internet access?


Forum Editor
Resolved

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I'm a self-confessed internet addict, spending a good deal of my working life online, and I'm afraid I have to check my emails, even when I'm on holiday.

I'm not alone but I wonder just how many of you also recognise the symptoms in yourselves - would you be OK without the internet for a couple of weeks, or if you're honest, would you feel something was missing if you didn't get your daily on-line fix?

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Bing.alau

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The Internet has transformed my shopping habits, I'm delighted to be able to search for an item on Amazon or somewhere else and order it with "one click" No bus or train to town and then mooching through shops in the rain searching and probably not finding the item I need. I am happy to say I would miss it very much.

I've just been talking to a friend about this subject. Of course the conversation wandered off track and we ended up talking about the things we have now, that we never had when we were young. Computers of all types, mobile phones in everybody's pocket, music systems ditto, Television sets, radio sets even. Yes when I was a boy we had a wireless which we had to power by wiring it up to an accumulator (I think that's what it was called anyway) Dad used to send us round to the back door of a house where we handed in the dead one and swapped it for a fully charged one. It must have cost money to do that, but I can't remember how much. I think the only program we could get at the time was from a place called Hilversum. Later wirelesses turned in to radios and we could get stations such as Radio Luxembourg and a few BBC programs such as The Light program (I miss Jimmy Young) and an overseas program which I believe was invaluable during the second world war. I don't think they had radio's or even wirelesses during the first World war. We didn't have electricity and some places didn't even have gaslight. When I was evacuated at the start of the second world war the house I lived in only used paraffin lamps. I could probably go on reminiscing but had better stop. (FE might silver mouse me) Then I would miss this forum too. Oh yes seasonal festive trees had little candle holders with real candles in them which we lit. Can you imagine Elf & Safety letting that happen now a days?

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morddwyd

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"It must have cost money to do that, but I can't remember how much."

2d at the local ironmongers.

It was damned heavy to cart across five fields, three stiles and a mile of metalled road (and back).

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Mr Mistoffelees

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Only 13 years ago I couldn't see why I should spend a lot of money on a PC that I would get of using within a few weeks, leaving it as an expensive white-elephant sitting in a corner.

Now I bank, shop, Tweet, email, use the iPlayer, play MMOs, catch-up with the world and local news, read and just surf. How could I fill the day without the internet? Even if we are going out, I check the weather online!

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Mr Mistoffelees

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Erratum

Should read: would get bored of using

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ams4127

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Yes, of course I could manage without the Internet. I still write letters using a fountain pen - so much more personal than an email. Shopping? Try walking, it's really quite easy! Booking holidays, use a phone book. Banking, try a bank!

For disabled people, I admit that the 'net is a boon. For anyone else, except those who depend on it for business, it's a bonus, not a necessity.

Get outside people, there's a strange substance out there and it's called fresh air. As long as there is daylight, I'm outside.

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Sapins

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Yes.

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Woolwell

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There are many things that I and my wife could not easily do without e-mail. We are able to do things at home which would otherwise mean travelling to work, etc. We can communicate with relatives overseas cheaply and keep up-to-date via social networks. An e-book reader has changed the way we read and purchase books. We were without for about 10 hours recently (ISP outage) and resorted to mobile phone tethering.

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woodchip

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Yes I could, it's not like the world would fall apart if it was not there. Though I can imagine it would for some

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HondaMan

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Short answer - Yes.

But it would be very difficult not to mention exceedingly frustrating

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Forum Editor

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HondaMan

**"Short answer - Yes. But it would be very difficult not to mention exceedingly frustrating"**

I think that sums it up perfectly for me.

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