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The UK has issued a "threat" to enter the Ecuadorian embassy in London


Forum Editor

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The impasse over our request that the Ecuadorian embassy should hand over Julian Assange looks like coming to a sudden end if our Foreign Office carries out its threat to enter the embassy and arrest him.

Swords are being rattled in advance of the Ecuadorians' declared intention to announce their decision regarding Assange's asylum request tomorrow (technically today, in view of the time now).

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Nontek

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Condom

Again, Thanks!

I did have a cursory look at john bunyons link, also looked at the article currently on MSN, so have got the general idea.

As I said, no more questions.

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woody

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"And we would, as long as the paperwork from the USA was correct, have complied with that request."

I seem to recall the USA asked for a certain Muslim circa 10yrs ago - we have paid over £M to help him stay plus his expenses and protection costs - when will he go? In the wiki case we are considering invading a sovereign state! By all means deport the lot including convicted murders etc but lets treat them all the same.

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WhiteTruckMan

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The matter of who it is (assange) is almost an irrelevance. What really, really, Really, concerns me is the threat of overturning an embassy's status through a legal contrivance. Even if we don't act on this threat (and lets not mince words here, it IS a threat) the very fact that it has been made has demonstrated that not only is an embassy on british soil no longer inviolate, but that any embassy anywhere in the world can be violated by the simple means of passing a law in the local legislature.

No doubt the home secretary has taken correct legal advice on this matter. However the lack of grasp of the long term implications is breathtaking!

WTM

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carver

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fourm member no it doesn't, it is some ones interpretation of events leaving out several very important points, but I suppose if it fits in with your view then it's OK.

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morddwyd

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I've read all the arguments and counter-arguments, and I'm probably over-simplifying, but surely the bottom line is that you simply can't extradite someone who isn't in your country?

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Condom

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The term rapewhich is being used here is not what I believe it would mean to us in the UK and we should therefore be very careful how we use it.

He is being asked to answer questions on an alleged offence which is unique to Sweden and nowhere else and concerns the use of condoms during sex. As he has already been questioned thoroughly by the Swedish Police on this matter and been released without charge I do find it extraordinary in the circumstances that these additional questions cannot be answered without him having to return to Sweden.

I'm not for one minute condoning what he is currently doing but this whole thing smells a bit like Hull when the fishing fleet returns. Apologies to all residents of Hull.

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Forum Editor

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Condom

Rape in Sweden has three legal classifications, all of them involve having sexual intercourse with a woman without her consent.

There is the most serious kind which involves serious violence. On conviction that carries a 10 year prison sentence.

Below that there is the crime of what is called 'regular' rape, still involving violence but not of the most serious kind. That carries a six year sentence.

Below that there is the crime of 'unlawful coercion', which might involve coercing a woman to have sex against her will. That carries a four year prison sentence.

I have no idea which of these levels is involved in the crime for which Assange is wanted for questioning, but two woman have separately alleged that he coerced them sexually, so it seems likely that it is the third, lowest crime level that is involved.

Whatever the details, he's wanted for questioning about an allegation of rape.

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Condom

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Yes I do agree that the Swedish Prosecutor has called it rape and that has been duplicated in the papers presented to the UK courts. I think we need to be very careful in what might be "lost in translation". I have been chatting with my Scandinavian friend whose English is pretty good as he puts the subtitles on many UK TV programs broadcast over there and even he is having problems explaining to me why the charges are unique to Sweden.

I'm pretty sure that if written guarantees were provided that he would be free to go where he pleases after going to Sweden then the problem would be resolved but apparently this is not forthcoming and questions have been asked over there why this is the case. The two "ladies" concerned from accounts from over there are not exactly "reliable" witnesses. I'm sure he would get a fair hearing but again if it came to trial most of these types of cases are not held in public but in private chambers so who is to tell. It would not be anything like what we would recognise as a trial.

All in all the whole thing is a messy situation with friction over there within the prosecutor's department and a political mess in this country.

Personally I would be happy if he turned up in Australia tomorrow and let them and Sweden sort it out but of course that will not happen.

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Flak999

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Regardless of the legal niceties regarding the questions Assange is being asked to answer, what now?

He has been granted asylum by Ecuador, do we think that the threat of removal of diplomatic status by the UK Government will be acted upon?

I seriously doubt it!

Has the foreign office upped the ante, only to have to humiliatingly back down? How will this resolve itself?

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Forum Editor

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Flak999

"Has the foreign office upped the ante, only to have to humiliatingly back down? How will this resolve itself?"

I doubt that the Foreign Office is going to back down, at least not in the sense you mean. I think things may quieten for a while, as behind the scenes talks between the F.O. and the Ecuadorian embassy take place.

The Ecuador Ambassador has made a rod for his own back with this, because he now has a non-paying guest and doesn't know what to do next. Assange can't stay in the embassy for ever, and as soon as his feet are on the street he'll be arrested. He jumped bail to go into the embassy, so there's a warrant for his arrest on that count anyway. As soon as he's arrested there will no doubt be attempts to delay extradition, but I'm sure he'll be taken to Sweden as fast as the UK and Swedish governments can get him there.

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