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Detecting Water Pipes


morddwyd

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When they installed our wet floor shower a couple of weeks ago I noticed that they used flexible rubber water pipes, like washing machine hoses, not the usual copper.

Question: now I want to fit a couple of grab handles how do I detect these non-metallic pipes?

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Condom

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I have usually found that the hammer and nail method works well. When you get a quirt of water in the eye you know you have hit the spot ;-)

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Mr Mistoffelees

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"I have usually found that the hammer and nail method works well. When you get a quirt of water in the eye you know you have hit the spot ;-)"

A similar method would work for finding concealed electricity cables. A nasty jolt, or shower of sparks, indicating success :-)

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lotvic

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"finding concealed electricity cables, shower of sparks, indicating success" and a blown circuit fuse. I can testify from prior experience (nailing down a loose floorboard) that method works 100%

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Condom

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One Sunday night years ago I was just checking an upstairs bedroom before the carpet layer came the next day to fit a new carpet. A floor board squeaked so clever me decided "a nail in time will save nine" and bashed one in, job done and went downstairs to watch TV. A couple of hours later, drip drip on her indoors head and a quick look at the ceiling showed a damp patch. It was hot water so obviously it was a radiator pipe. One emergency plumber later on Sunday night rates made my nail a very expensive one. Lesson learned the hard way.

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morddwyd

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"Surely they should have installed proper safety equipment when they installed the shower?"

they did, but the shower is for my wife, who is perfectly safe in a wet wheelchair.

The grab handles are for me while I sstand on one leg to dry my tootsies..

My needs are not covered by the Council Grant!

"I would consider getting them back to do it."

Get who back to do what? Drill a dozen holes?

The company that was used is based fifty miles away. Any guess at the call out charge for a 100 mile round trip?

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Aitchbee

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A possible solution:- Perhaps one of those disability aluminium walking frames with rubberized feet might serve your purpose...I have just had 4 of them uplifted.(They had belonged to a neighbour).They are very light and easily took my weight (111 kg) 17 stones.

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Shopgirl

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AitchBee maybe you should off kept them. You might need them with all the weight that you are carrying.

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rdave13

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Aitchbee , if you're not 7ft tall then I suggest a bit more gardening on your veranda. :-\

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Aitchbee

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...I was just making a weighty point, folks.

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rdave13

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Aitchbee - of course your veranda is strongly built.

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