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Parcel delivery - why is it such a problem?


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I am expecting a package from Amazon - they are replacing a faulty Kindle, and they played their part by despatching it the day after I spoke to them. The usual efficient Amazon service working as it should, until.....

The courier called at my house, and I was out. My wife was out, so a card was left - 'we'll deliver again tomorrow'.

The next day, I was out, but my wife stayed in for the delivery, except for fifteen minutes when she had to dash to the pharmacy. While she was there, the courier called. Another card, saying 'your package is being returned to Amazon'. A hurried email from me, asking for another delivery, resulted in a promise to redeliver on Saturday, and this time one of us will be there at all times.

I can't fault the courier (Thank you, Citysprint) or Amazon - we're the culprits, my wife and I, but we're not alone; apparently 12% of all home deliveries fail first time, costing the Courier industry (and indirectly all of us who use it) an estimated £1billion.

It's a growing problem and I was wondering - should those of us who regularly have packages delivered have a special 'package box' bolted to the outside of our houses, along the lines of the old bank night-safes?

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Brumas

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A couple of years ago I bodged together a small wooden box, an approximate 14" square, with a removable sloping lid and attached it to the wall by the side of the car port. No lock, just a brick on the lid to combat the winds and it works splendidly. All the postmen who deliver to us use it and we have had no problems, apart from the bees which somehow colonised it one day, but no problems of things going astray or getting soaking wet.

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natdoor

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I seem to remember that some years ago there was talk of setting up secure collection points at suitable premises such as petrol stations. Perrhaps it was tried but obviously did not go global.

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interzone55

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natdoor

ADT used to use that system for their service engineers.

The engineer would request parts for the next day, and they'd be delivered to the Esso garage nearest the job...

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Belatucadrus

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We also have a wooden box at the end of the drive, used by newspaper man & postie 99% of the time with no problem. It does however bug me when I find the card in it saying "Sorry you were out" particularly when we weren't. What it usually translates too is "It's too big for the box and I can't be fagged to walk to the door, get it yourself".

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daz60

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A recent article in the press suggests that the royal mail can leave items with the neighbour,this in a society where virtually everyone does not know these neighbours and where trust is at a minimum.

"we're the culprits"

why?....people lead busy lives's with work and other things,companies must,at least,understand this.

I have received numerous parcels lately and on many of those occasions a card has been left stating that a delivery has been attempted but because no reply at the door could be ascertained a delivery note was left and i had to collect from the depot.

This is not so much a problem,i only live 500,+- a few, yards from the depot but on a number of occasions i have been in the house and not heard a knock on the door and,on one occasion, seen a notice come through the letterbox .

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Forum Editor

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"I seem to remember that some years ago there was talk of setting up secure collection points at suitable premises such as petrol stations. Perrhaps it was tried but obviously did not go global."

There are Amazon locker boxes at some large office buildings in London. You can pick up your parcel from a box when you key in a code provided by Amazon, and you can drop items for return in the boxes. If the system is a success - and I can't see it failing - the scheme will be extended. There is already an Amazon locker system at Brent Cross shopping centre, which isn't too far from where I live. I didn't think of asking for my package to go there at the time.

Returning my faulty Kindle will be much easier - I can send it back to Amazon by dropping it off at my local Collect+ shop. This is a scheme whereby corner shops accept and return parcels for major online retailers. My Kindle can go back from my local newsagents free of charge, using the label that Amazon has emailed to me.

Big companies which trade online are all keen to solve this problem of failed deliveries, and the locker box system or Collect+ are two helpful solutions, provided you live near enough to a collection or delivery point.

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Forum Editor

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morddwyd

"Virtually every courier leaves parcels in the porch, even if we are in, but DHL, who no longer deliver here, never would."

My package must be signed for, or it can't be delivered. Our postman will leave stuff for me in a location that he and I agreed on some time ago, but it's not supposed to happen. Professional couriers should never leave packages in porches - they aren't insured for any losses that occur if they do,and if you make private arrangements with a courier driver he/she will be placing the company at risk.

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spuds

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daz60

That article wasn't quite true, even though Royal Mail leave a 'Something for you' card, which states 'As requested, your item has been left (A) in your official Safeplace as detailed on the item (B) with your designated neighbour'.

I have letters from Royal Mail Customer services (lower and higher level) plus a letter from Royal Mail Postal Review Panel, that states the rules, regarding this. Even though Royal Mail advertise or state 'with designated neighbour' on the card, they do not and are not allowed to provide this 'designated neighbour' service?.

With regards to 'Safeplace', this can be anywhere (dustbin, over the garden fence!!), providing the instruction are written on the item or item's being delivered. You would need to tell the sender about 'your Safeplace' so it is clearly displayed on the item. The Safeplace idea, is experimental at present.

Now whether the post-person ignores rules, then that's another thing?.

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Snec

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I don't find it a problem at all because when a parcel is due we always ensure someone stays in. It can be a nuisance sometimes, like when the parcel is delivered a day later than expected and someone has to stay in the second day.

What would be a problem is if the wife "nipped out" for fifteen minute and missed it, yes that would be a problem and if it were my parcel I think I would have to divorce her.

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morddwyd

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"Professional couriers should never leave packages in porches - they aren't insured for any losses that occur if they do,and if you make private arrangements with a courier driver he/she will be placing the company at risk."

I'm well aware of that, but they do.

Like I said, it's a very free and easy system.

My local depot is 100 mile round trip, and I wouldn't think going that far for anything, let alone the £7 pack of blank discs they left yesterday!

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