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I've stood as much as I can stand


csqwared
Resolved

Likes # 0

and I can't stand no more!!!

Can posters please sort out the difference between lose and loose (loser and looser). The amount of times these two words are mis-used is staggering.

Lose - to misplace. Loser - someone not in the lead. Loose - not tight. Looser - not as tight.

Rant over Ducking behind parapet.

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morddwyd

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Pilot used to swear that when he was at full throttle on the Avons the airflow was driving the props on the piston engines, rather than the other way around!

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morddwyd

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"Put the promotion back a trifle what old boy!"

D'you think so?

Perhaps that's why I was a quarter of a century in the same rank!

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Forum Editor

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morddwyd

"I was simply letting him know that I was the original author."

Thank you. I appreciate the thought.

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flycatcher1

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morddwyd 50% of 40 years in my case, reached the peak of my career too soon!

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flycatcher1

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Regional language can be a source of fun. I asked for a pint and a half in a hotel bar in Aberdeen years ago. The Barman thought that I was taking the mickey when I complained about what he put on the bar. Luckily I had a Glaswegian with me who intervened and explained the stupidity of the Englishman who did not know that a pint and a half was, well, a pint and a half.

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Aitchbee

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The 'half', flycatcher1 is referring to, means a 1/4, 1/5, or in some pubs a 1/6 of a gill of whisky.

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flycatcher1

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Yes,AitchBEE, but some of the drinkers mixed in with the beer, some drank it before the beer and some afterwards.

On that particular day we ended up at the Theatre Royal, near the Docks (?) in Aberdeen, a real linguistic joy for me, it was Glasgow Trades Week.

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john bunyan

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From Wiki:

Scotland

In Scotland, a half and a half (a hauf an a hauf)2 is a dram of whisky and a half-pint of heavy as a 'chaser'.[3][4]

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Graham*

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How about 'ect' for 'etc'? That jumps right off the screen for me.

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morddwyd

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"From whence."

It's tautology.

We don't say "Get thee to hence, thou varlet", whereas "Get thee hence" trips off the tongue a lot more readily.

Psalm 121 has a lot to answer for!

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