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Water pressure


simonjary
Resolved

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Has anyone noticed a drop in their home's water pressure?

A plumber told me that the water companies (Thames Water, at least) had reduced water pressure in the mains to reduce consumption.

Our water pressure has certainly dropped, and we suspected a misfunctioning boiler. It seems that we can all expect a drop as water companies reduce pressure in the mains while we remain in drought.

According to the newspapers the driest part of England, the South East, has less water per person than Syria or the Sudan!

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Woolwell

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I had to have a pressure reducing valve fitted otherwise the pressure would have been too much for the boiler. No recent reduction in pressure noted but there isn't a water shortage here and in fact in the past 24 hours we have had rather too much rain.

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natdoor

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For most premises the water pressure for all outlets apart from the kitchen tap is determined by the height drop from the storage tank, unless internal pumps are used. Systems which are fed directly from the mains should have pressure-reducing fittings.

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Woolwell

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natdoor - most premises nowadays are fed directly from the mains and do not have a storage tank. Water from a storage tank in a house would not be of drinking quality.

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Forum Editor

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There's often a good deal of confusion about water supplies - mainly over the difference between water pressure and flow rates.

As Simon pointed out, water companies are under an obligation to provide a minimum static head pressure on domestic mains. The flow rate from any given outlet will vary according to the internal bore size of the pipe supplying it. At any given static head pressure the amount of water flowing from an open 22mm copper pipe will obviously be much greater than that flowing from a 15mm pipe.

Left to itself,pressure in the street mains rises at night because less water is being drawn. In situations where the street main is an old cast-iron pipe with flange joints this night-time pressure increase can be the straw that breaks the the camel's back - underground mains can rupture. Water companies therefore reduce mains pressure during the night as a safeguard.

New street mains are made from welded joint high density polyethylene, and are immensely resistant to internal pressure changes.

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Aitchbee

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Thanks FE that was very informative...honestly. I did not know that.

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namtas

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Chegs

Is there some special reason as to why you cannot partially close down the stop valve to reduce the mains pressure ?

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Woolwell

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Closing the stop cock reduces the flow not the pressure. Pressure reducing valves are the solution.

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Forum Editor

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Partially closing your mains stopcock may resulting in 'singing' on the main. It can be very irritating; a better solution is to fit a pressure reducing valve that has been specifically designed for the job.

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Chegs ®™

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I have asked before to have a pressure reducing valve installed,I'll try asking again though we can't afford to buy another shower as I have no means of earning a wage as my car is a(nother)write-off.Whatever was fitted to the boiler last visit(about 4mths ago)seems to be coping with the water pressure,or the heating systems top-up pipework being left disconnected & us given intructions to only connect them back up when the gauge on the front of the boiler drops into the red,then disconnect the pipes again once the meters back in the green is the cure.

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natdoor

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woolwell

I am aware that new builds do not have storage tanks. However, I still believe that most properties have them.

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