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So farewell the Britannica


interzone55

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After 244 years of deforestation Encyclopaedia Britannica has ended it's print run to move to a pure digital edition

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-17362698

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Quickbeam

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Our school had a set, and if you wanted to use them, you had to show your clean (very clean) hands to the sour faced librarian and explain why, just in case a minor reference book would suffice. We also had to use them on a table within sight of her at all times.

I wonder what precautions she would have had in place for copy of Magna Carta in a comprehensive school!

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Toneman

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Mention of Arthur Mee, was that the Children's Encyclopedia which I have behind me as I write, very useful for a poetry anthology without having to Google..

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Aitchbee

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Toneman ... you are correct...it's good to know that a lot of things hadn't been invented in 1955, when ten red volumes were puplished.

ah...the innocence of youth...(big sigh).

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Aitchbee

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...hardly any spelling mistakes in them either...'published', of course.

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ams4127

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My first ever job was trying to sell them in and around London during the early '60s.

Our manager would take us out to one of the suburbs each day and drop us off in various locations. You were then on your own to tramp around the streets knocking on doors. I lasted about two months and sold two sets.

My next job was as a doorman at a strip club in Soho. I enjoyed that one a lot more!!

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Brumas

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I acquired a second hand set over 15 years ago and used them whenever I needed to, however the internet has made me lazy as it only requires a couple of keystrokes and I can now have the answer in a flash.

I shall never get rid of them as I still use them now and then and they look smart in the bookcase ;o}

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Diemmess

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A word for Chambers Encyclopaedia.

'Grandpa' (a retired Presbyterian minister and a widower) had little to attract me when visiting, or actually staying at his house on holiday in the late 40s.

Apart from the many delights of the place, (Whitby) at his house there was this fascinating old row of Chambers leather bound and printed in the time of our "Dear Queen Victoria." On his death the encyclopaedia migrated to my home in the Midlands.

Hopelessly out of date, but worth lots of browsing to find how knowledge and research had progressed over nearly a century. I think my parents gave this collection away when they downsized in later years.

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Forum Editor

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The whole idea of an encyclopaedia is now well past its prime - who needs an encyclopaedia when there's Google to give you access to more information that 1000 encyclopaedias could ever contain?

Remember Microsoft's Encarta, the digital encylopaedia for the 21st century? It's gone - the shutters went up in 2009 because people just weren't bothering. Much easier to ask Google to show you what you need to know.

The world changes all the time, and at the moment the rate of change is accelerating.

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Bingalau

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Quickbeam. Shall I come out with the old classic answer, "I don't need them now, because I got married, Wife knows everything!"

There was an interview on BBC Radio Two this afternoon with a gentleman from the E.B. He made it clear that they are not stopping printing altogether, but will be doing it mostly digitally. He also spoke with various people around the country who told him about the sets they bought and still have. Some descriptions of things in their infancy were described such as helicopters, and computers. It seems the computer was thought to be used only for number bashing.

Anyway it also appears that some editions are quite valuable, I think the set from 1911 was one of them. But the older the better. I don't know if you can get "catch Up" on the radio, but if you can it is worth listening to.

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morddwyd

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".it's good to know that a lot of things hadn't been invented in 1955, when ten red volumes were puplished."

The Children's' Encyclopaedia was published a lot earlier than that.

Our copy was used by my mother when she was a child, and she was born in 1904.

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