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Water saving tips


ams4127
Resolved

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Dwr Cymru (Welsh Water) are coming tomorrow to fit a water meter.

I have already filled two water butts and put a brick in the toilet cistern. I know about not running the tap when washing teeth. But what I need are some of your own expert water saving tips.

Any advice will be most gratefully received.

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Aitchbee

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Some poor people in Syria were catching snowflakes in makeshift recepticles last week... for drinking water...it was on TV

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onthelimit1

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Dual flush cisterns help (if the people using them know which button to press). The difference between a full flush and a partial one can be adjusted to suit.

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SparkyJack

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Take the Meter. Flat rate charges are based on a family of 2 adults and two kids usinbg the baths/showers washing machines etc. If there are just two of you you or even one you will be paying over the odds As I live alone now my additional tips are have enough clothing to enable you to do an economic wash load load one a fortnight. Take showers not a batc, put enough water iun the kettle for the single cuppa. Result - whilst my neighbours pay £280 pa flat rate My metered bill is just £7 per month.

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rdave13

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ams4127, if you are a family with two children it will be interesting to find out how much cheaper your water bill will be using a meter. I'd appreciate a feedback later on. Thanks.

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simonjary

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Supposedly using a (full!) dishwasher is more water and energy efficient than washing everything by hand.

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ams4127

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Thank you all for your kind and, in some cases, most amusing tips.

WTM, diluting the water had not occurred to me. Most excellent!!

Rdave13. It is just myself and the revered memsahib but i will let you know how much, if anything, the meter will have saved.

Again, many thanks to you all for taking the trouble to reply. I am much obliged.

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Bingalau

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ams4127. I do know that when I changed to a meter my water bill went down from over £50 per month (on the rates) to approx £17 per month. It has since settled to about £21 per month. But I do not try to go without water in any shape or form. I love keeping my rickety old spine under the hot shower water and have to force myself to get out from under. But I linger there as long as I want really. I always have put just enough water in a kettle for the amount of cups needed. That has always been to save on electricity though. I don't have a dishwasher but have always used my washing up water on plants and the grass etc. The washing up liquid probably does more good than harm. I've got a water butt in the garden as well and always have had, not just since changing to a meter.

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morddwyd

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The last time I asked for a water meter to be fitted the rental was more than the annual water charge.

I did not proceed!

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badgery

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Bingalau

Must be pretty special water round your way at £600 pa! (Then again the 'pool was always a bit special for me!).

Good Scottish water costs me £224 pa,(£18.50 per month) for a large detached house. Never even considered asking for a meter, nor have the water people asked me to have one.

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Condom

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I remember chatting to one of my hospital engineers about bricks in cisterns and he told me it was OK to do in large systems as they always had a lot of use. Dual flush sytems were also good provided you used the shorter flush for waterworks.

He told me a larger flow was better for solids and that using a brick often left the drains at risk of gumming up as there was not sufficient waterflow.

I'm not sure how accurate all this information is but it cetrainly put me off using a brick at home.

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