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Good to be in Scotland?


badgery
Resolved

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With the English NHS reforms and now the police, I certainly feel there's a lot of change being done in the south that I don't remember in any manifestos. Happy to be up here!

police

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badgery

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"its programme is following the coalition agreement and not any manifesto."

Exactly, non manifesto as I said earlier!

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Macscouse

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Here on the Costa del Nairn, our "local" police inspector has his office in Kingussie, 42 miles and a lifetime away when the roads are blocked by snow. What happens when one police force takes over? 999 calls to Stirling, 160 miles away?

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lucky1

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The headquarters of the combined Scottish Police Force is to be at the Scottish Police College at Tulliallan Castle, Kincardine. Now that's what you call central for Macscouse up in Nairn!!

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morddwyd

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When I had a complaint about a traffic warden in Ullapool, Wester Ross being a bit of a prima donna I wrote to his gaffer in Inverness, fifty odd miles away, and received I very courteous reply and an aoplogy.

If I had sent the same complaint to Glasgow (never mind the temporary hq in Fife, does anybody really doubt that it will end up in Strathclyde?), over 200 miles, I'm not at all sure I would have got the same response!

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Aitchbee

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Today my friend, who is a road-sweeper in Glasgow (south-side), told me, that he has seen many people, who smoke and throw their spent cigarette butts away 'nonchalantly' on the pavements or roads, being instantly fined £50. ( And quite right - I say).

Has the rest of the UK caught up with Scotland, on this issue?

(ps - I have seen some poor people picking up cigarette butts, to reuse them).

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Forum Editor

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I think that Keith Vaz has made an important point, and I believe that the involvement of commercial organisations in criminal investigations will turn out to be an unmitigated disaster.

The private sector's involvement in terms of supplying Police with equipment has no bearing on the issue. It doesn't involve the suppliers with operational matters, or bring them into contact with investigating officers, or those being investigated.

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badgery

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FE

Absolutely.
Why on earth, with their NHS plans already causing so much distress and antagonism, does Cameron decide to 'open this new front', and now bring the police into direct conflict with him? Surely not to distract voters from his NHS plans?

I, also, fear that these new proposals will be counter-productive, due to possible distrust by our 'real' police officers of these new investigators.

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carver

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badgery it's privatisation by any means possible and with the current financial situation it give them a reason to go ahead with it.

It's not just the police they are after it is any thing that they can sell off and when you get Oliver Letwin the Cabinet Minister saying, "Private companies working in hospitals, police and schools will “no longer be a matter of debate” after the Coalition’s reforms of public services." click here you wonder just how far they are prepared to go.

If it goes wrong then Clegg and his cronies will get all the blame and if by any chance it works then Cameron will take the credit.

You have to remember what a good job they did with the railways.

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Forum Editor

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"Why on earth, with their NHS plans already causing so much distress and antagonism, does Cameron decide to 'open this new front'"

Like many things, this move has been considered necessary because Police budgets are to be cut - it's a cost-saving proposal, and it will probably work in that respect.

The likely peripheral consequences concern me - damage to Police morale, and the involvement of private security staff in criminal investigations. I know that we're told there will be no powers of arrest, and that investigations will always be supervised by serving police officers, but that's not the point. We'll have commercially-minded people making judgements on a day-to-day basis, and they will necessarily have their company's bottom line at the forefront of their minds.

It's a potential minefield, and I believe we will rue the day we did this.

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spuds

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Perhaps the wedge was already in the door, when private enterprise started to build and run prisons and detention centres. Plus private companies taking over responsibilities like custody/escort officers,forensics and perhaps not forgetting Street Marshall's that are operating in some areas, where the police and other emergency services have required support.

Even your local council have gotten into the act, by being given extra powers of fining and revising or using certain bye-laws to gain those extra powers. Some of which are not now proving to be an advantage to the public on the whole?.

The problem being that the people who are offering or want to offer these services, tend to cherry pick the most profitable. A number of private enterprise companies have taken over the running of schools, council housing and police or other emergency services maintenance contracts already (which are essential public services), and some of these have already failed, with the public then having to come to the aid of these failed projects, so the project can continue in doing the job it was originally intended to do?.

PCSO were brought in, with the hope that this would help maintain a police response and perhaps reduce spending for police forces. Just check on what what your local PCSO as to do, and how similar this might seem to what is being proposed. Initially some of the revenue for this service was from the closure of police funded traffic warden services. Funding for PCSO's are possibly going to be considered after the Olympics, and some forces are already considering this in future budgets?.

On perhaps are far wider scale, there are already discussions on changing the MOD policing arrangements, to a transfer to private sector contractor's.

So perhaps in a nutshell, what seems to be a simple task of discussion or 'making ends meet' can have far bigger consequences in the long term?.

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