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Fire fighting equipent in your home


Noldi

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Today I had to attend a Vehicle Fire Training course with the Royal Berkshire fire brigade, after the course had finished the subject changed to home and what we have around the house, I have had new mains fire and carbon monoxide alarms installed recently. What I don't have is adequate fire fighting at home like a fire blanket or extinguishers, the best piece of fire fighting equipment I could arrange at present would be a car wash bucket or a wet blanket. This weekend I will have to resolve this. How many of you are in a similar situation regarding the perpetration if you had a fire in your home.

Noldi. 

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Condom

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I have one fire alarm and one gas dectector with the intention of getting the hell out if a fire should occur during the night. In the garage behind the fire door from the kitchen I have 2 large CO2 fire extinguishers which I obtained from a nurses home which was being knocked down but I have not been very successful in getting anyone to come and do their annual check, whch I know I should really get done sooner rather than later.

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carver

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We have 4 smoke detectors in the house and that is it, the only fire I would even think about tackling would be a chip pan fire with a damp cloth.

As long as every one gets out safely that is my only consideration and the house can just burn.

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interzone55

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Quickbeam

have you ever set off a dry powder fire extinguisher? It's quite spectacular, but can make a hell of a mess, albeit less mess than a fire.

In most cases the sort of fire that would need powder is a chip pan fire, so consider changing it for Class F Wet Chemical extinguisher that will turn the fat to gel

http://www.mfs-fire-extinguishers.co.uk/wet-chemical.htm

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spuds

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We have a number of smoke detectors around the property. A fire blanket plus extinguisher in the kitchen. A monoxide detector in the main room, which the low battery test alarm seems to go off at the slightest moment, even though we do not use the gas fire any more.

One thing that I noticed a couple of years ago, was when we changed to a new home insurance company. The new policy stated in the small print section, that we had to have two 'working' fire extinguishers available in the house. Never noticed this on other policies that we have held over the years, so it might pay to check your recent home insurance policy and cover, to see if this is now becoming a basic standard requirement?.

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Chegs ®™

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Two smoke detectors & nothing else.In the event of a fire,I intend to get everyone out the house & wait for the Fire Brigade.

Many years ago,I returned home drunk,peeled my fingers & a few potatoes & put the chip pan on,fell asleep in the chair & was wakened by my Mother's arrival next morning.The kitchen was gutted but being a terraced house the kitchen was an extention off the back so all the damage was there & though the whole house stunk,none of it was damaged.I've also had a flat broken into and set on fire (possibly to hide their intrusion)The fire was so intense that the glass had melted in the ornaments & bulbs & yet the resident of the flat above was unharmed(knew nothing about it until the fire brigade broke in)The police decided to arrest me for arson & it was fortunate for me that I had 100's of club goers as witnesses to prove I was nowhere near the flat until the following day.

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WhiteTruckMan

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To everyone who has a dry powder extinguisher, take note! They are similar in construction to a 'water gas' type, that is they are full of powder, with a probe down to the bottom. When activated a co2 cannister pressurises the container forcing the powder up the probe and out. however if they have been stood for a time then the powder tends to settle and compact, with the result that the gas will find its way down the outside of the probe then out, leaving the mass of the powder behind. I was advised by both the instuctors at the raf firefighting course, and my hazardous goods trainers to give the extinguisher a good whack on a solid surface to shake the powder up before activation.

Also beware of co2 extinguishers. When in use they get very cold indeed, so to avoid a freeze burn use them by the handles provided. Do NOT hold them by the metal casing!

Firefighting appliances are usefull things, but like many items, need using properly and with care.

WTM

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wiz-king

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When I worked in a perfume factory everyone had to use a fire extinguisher once a year. Even the typing pool 'girls'. Any extinguishers that went out of date were used for training, we used to set light to a big tray of petrol and everyone got to play with a dry-powder, co2 and wet type of extinguisher and was shown how to use them (and what not to use!)

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Fruit Bat /\0/\

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I used to teach "fire refresher courses"

Initial fire training including use of extinguishers was done by the "experts"

We just did a yearly reminder on types of and colour code for extinguishers (no longer colour coded), and fire safety plans / drills.

Do you and your family have and all know a fire plan for your home?

Have a smoke alarm, tested regularly. A fire blanket in the kitchen,

Didn't bother with extinguishers as best bet is to get out ASAP, so made sure windows would open far enough for easy exit and have emergency ladder stowed in wardrobe to allow exit via upstairs windows if stairs is blocked.

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spuds

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One point to perhaps consider or remember is double glazing. Many people have had problems of escape with older design double glazing sections, and the law tightened up designs for easier escape. There is also the consideration of having the double glazing locked, with no key present. Perhaps off subject, but older double glazed units, might not have correct ventilation in-builds, especially where gas fires are being used.

People have also found that trying to shatter a double glazed unit, can be difficult. Throwing a large chair will not also do the job, but a small impact in the 'right area' will.

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Noldi

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Wiz-King Things have changed a lot now I now know of several companies that don't allow you to fight fires you just have to get out, it has to be left to qualified personal, I suppose if you injured yourself you could sue the company or a requirement by the insurance company ?.

I am now a proud owner of several fire blankets :-)

Noldi

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