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Are you working class or middle class?


ordep

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I heard an interesting quote on the radio yesterday as to how you define yourself as working class or middle class.

Working class shower in the evening. Middle class shower in the morning.

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Aitchbee

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My definition of a 'classy person', is someone, who listens to other people, and gives them their undivided attention, with sincerity.

Diamond Geezers...is a better phrase.

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Bingalau

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I have an independent income from the government, it's called a pension. (in fact I have a few) So does that make me middle class? As an ex service person I suppose I was working class of course, if not lower, as Rudyard Kipling would testify. But I know people quite well, who were Officers and Gentlemen, which would put them in the upper class strata. Do they revert to being middle or lower class when they end their service in the forces? I know we used to have a member on here who glorified in his ex-rank of Major. (or was it Colonel?) I wonder if he still uses the forum?

Apart from the difference in class, I wonder what makes one a Gentleman? I've met some real "gents" in my lifetime and some who professed to be "gents" but I wouldn't call them that.

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Condom

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I actually shower only twice a day in the UK but normally 3 times when overseas. It is probably just a habit I got into as did my brother-in-law when he was a CE in the Merchant Navy.

It also keeps the maids busy with all the extra washing and ironing with the towells..:-)

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Forum Editor

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"Working class shower in the evening. Middle class shower in the morning"

That makes me working class at night and middle class during the day. What a lot of nonsense it all is.

My father was born and brought up in a small Welsh mining community. He was working underground shortly after he left school, aged 15.

By the time he was 40 he was an RAF Wing Commander and Commanding Officer of an RAF station. He certainly considered himself to be middle class by then, and I have always thought of myself as being the same. I was brought up to take people as I find them, and not to put them into pigeon holes, however tempting it might sometimes be.

What really gets me is people who bang on about how proud they are to be working class, and how much they despise the upper classes. I have no idea what that's all about, or why it should be so important to them. In the end there are people with whom you identify and people with whom you don't identify quite so much. There's no harm in it, and no need to make such a fuss about it.

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Chegs ®™

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I'm skint/unable to work & live in the North of England where I couldn't give a pigs burp about class.All I'm interested in is whether someone is friendly.

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Quickbeam

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But the reality of the report is based on that if you have a clean office based job that involves meeting clients, you'll want to be clean and shaven at the start of the day. If you're a groundworker on a site, or a pig keeper, you know your going to get dirtier as the day wears on, and you need to get the dirt off at the end of the day.

So really it should be 'are you a manual worker or a white collar worker?' Either way you will be a worker.

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morddwyd

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"What really gets me is people who bang on about how proud they are to be working class, and how much they despise the upper classes. "

It's called inverted snobbery, and is just as prevalent as the other sort, some would say more so!

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WhiteTruckMan

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Class to me has nothing to do with occupation, wealth, residence or even bathing habits. To me, it's how you relate to others. If you respect others in both manners and deeds then that puts you in the upper class in my book. Displays of ignorance or arrogance are all that is needed to confirm a lack of class, in my opinion.

WTM

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Input Overload

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I still keep ferits under the table, but live in a nice area, some of the time my job is physical work but also I also interact with those from the upper echelons of society during my work though & have had to develop a personality that covers just about everyone, I've sat in the boardroom at Ferranti in a suit but also have cut 2500 tonnes of coal on night shift.

I've been called a snob & much worse because of where I live, which amuses greatly. Times change & now often I work in & around the wharf in Ldn & conversely the next week perhaps installing a small UPS in an opticians where you get looked down on by reception staff.

Some people for example who wear a plastic tab with 'Manger' seem to feel they are superior in some way & show it though they also show they are as thick as a plank during conversation - These are the people with class problems - I have no time for inverted snobs, no time whatsoever & I do show it.

The most fun I ever had though was down a coal mine. I'm who I am, that's all - I feel if you have issues regarding your so called class you are you have a big problem with life itself & life is just not long enough for that.

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Input Overload

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WhiteTruckMan - Spot on there 100%.

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