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Electric Cars


ams4127
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Found this on another website. Makes for some interesting reading.

*Eric Bolling (Fox Business Channel's Follow the Money) test drove the Chevy Volt at the invitation of General Motors.

For four days in a row, the fully charged battery lasted only 25 miles before the Volt switched to the reserve gasoline engine.

Eric calculated the car got 30 mpg including the 25 miles it ran on the battery. So, the range including the 9 gallon gas tank and the 16 kwh battery is approximately 270 miles. It will take you 4 1/2 hours to drive 270 miles at 60 mph. Then add 10 hours to charge the battery and you have a total trip time of 14.5 hours. In a typical road trip your average speed (including charging time) would be 20 mph.

According to General Motors, the Volt battery hold 16 kwh of electricity. It takes a full 10 hours to charge a drained battery.

The cost for the electricity to charge the Volt is never mentioned so I looked up what I pay for electricity. I pay approximately (it varies with amount used and the seasons) $1.16 per kwh.

16 kwh x $1.16 per kwh = $18.56 to charge the battery. $18.56 per charge divided by 25 miles = $0.74 per mile to operate the Volt using the battery. Compare this to a similar size car with a gasoline engine only that gets 32 mpg. $3.19 per gallon divided by 32 mpg = $0.10 per mile.

The gasoline powered car cost about $15,000 while the Volt costs $46,000.

So GM wants us to pay 3 times as much for a car that costs more that 7 times as much to run and takes 3 times as long to drive across country.*

Ho Hum!

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morddwyd

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"A battery powered car isn't practicable as it wouldn't survive an evening's deliveries"

And yet the old milk and bakery floats used to manage a full day's deliveries fifty years ago!

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canarieslover

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morddwyd My Mother in Law used to do a bakers round with one of those and more often than not they would have to send the lorry out to tow her back to the depot. I believe that those batteries used to account for three quarters of the empty vehicle weight which would not make them suitable for a passenger vehicle. I know battery technology has changed since then but not enough to shrink the battery small enough and still get reasonable mileage out of it. Probably petrol/electric is the way to go unless you want to carry a spare battery as well as a spare wheel.

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Forum Editor

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In Chicago I've seen electric delivery lorries nipping around the city. I was told that they can do 100miles between charges, and have a 7400 Kg payload.

Fedex runs electric delivery vehicles, and Sainsburys has a fleet of seventy 3.5 tonne vans. It makes good sense - businesses get 100% capital allowance in the first year for electric vans, and electric company cars are exempt from road tax for five years.

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morddwyd

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"Probably petrol/electric is the way to go"

Battery development is the way to go.

In any electrically powered non-mains device the battery takes up a large proportion of the space and weight.

While technology has made great strides, we need a quantum change, akin to the breakthrough from electronic valves to transistors.

My first transistor radio had seven transistors, and made great advertising play of the fact!

Once we get the same sort of development in batteries we are looking at battery powered aeroplanes and even space travel.

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Forum Editor

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"Once we get the same sort of development in batteries we are looking at battery powered aeroplanes and even space travel."

Researchers at MIT have developed a new type of battery, based on what is called a semi solid flow cell.

"The new design should make it possible to reduce the size and the cost of a complete battery system, including all of its structural support and connectors, to about half the current levels. That dramatic reduction could be the key to making electric vehicles fully competitive with conventional gas- or diesel-powered vehicles, the researchers say."

The concept is still in development, but they should have something ready for engineering for production as a replacement for existing electric car batteries by the end of 2013.

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Input Overload

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Agree with morddwyd 100%. I work in installing & maintaining large & small UPS systems & we still use (sealed)lead acid batteries which are certainly not light, if as the FE says lighter batteries are on the way it will certainly help my back & fingers out.

Also lead acid are not easy to recycle & require to be changed every few years regardless.

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