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Decided to stop smoking


carver

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Last Saturday I had my last cigarette and decided that was the start of a life without smoking.

Been hard going since then, clutch went on car Sunday and can't get it fixed till Friday because of waiting for parts, my daughter broke 2 fingers because of a horse rearing and her finger were trapped in bridle also on Sunday.

Yesterday Monday, built in gas cooker decided to commit suicide and now we have no cooker, but I am determined to stop smoking so phoned doctors this morning to see if I could get an appointment with a doctor to get help.

After waiting for about 5 minutes to get someone to pick a phone up at the doctors this is the response I got, NO appointments till next Monday to see a doctor, did I want to see the person who runs the stop smoking clinic, yes please well she only comes in once a week and that is on Monday afternoon.

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marvin42

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I stopped with the help of champix (prescription from GP) after many years of trying. If you've already stopped I wouldn't advice nicotine replacement as this will only put nicotine back into your system. If you smoked 20 a day, I believe that's around £6. If you weaken now it could take a year to do it again so the next cigarette will cost you £6 times 365 days = £2190!!!

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carver

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buteman thanks that has cheered me up, any way thank you all for your support. I will be honest and say that today is the first day I have been out since I stopped smoking.

I've not got any cigarettes in the house and I was bothered about going to the supermarket and seeing all those cigarettes lined up but it didn't bother me.

I have worked out that by stopping smoking I will save myself about £2500 a year and hopefully be far healthier, even now after only 4 days I do feel better and if I can make it till next week without a smoke I reckon I am half way to stopping.

It is funny though that I haven't smoked in the house for over 20 years and now I have this strange craving to go out side and stand in the cold.

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Terry Brown

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I agree it is a good thing to stop smoking for your heath, but also because now it is socially unacceptable in a public place.

Have you noticed when you go into an area where someone has smoked how much more you can smell it?.

Why won't any government ban it-- simple because it (and alcohol) raises large amounts of tax and the companies have large funds to lobby (bribe?) the controlling bodies to do the absolute minimum.

If only the DRUG trade could be controlled in the same way (made socially unacceptable), we may get somewhere with it.

Terry

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ventanas

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I think it's all to do with the actual will to stop. I smoked for 45 years and decided to quite simply because I wanted to. Just about the easiest thing I've ever done. Haven't smoked for 6 years and have never missed it one little bit. Shows that, in my case, it was purely habit and nothing more. If you're determined you will do it.

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interzone55

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I've never smoked, so I've not clear idea what you and your body are going through, but from talking to addicts whilst writing an article on addiction about 10 years ago, I got the impression that tobacco was by far the toughest habit to kick.

Tobacco addiction, like heroin, is both physical and mental, it's in many ways the perfect drug. Your body craves it's fix of nicotine, so the brain invents a suitable excuse - "It's my body, so I'll kill myself if I want to" is my mother-in-law's favourite.

My former mother-in-law was a Smoking Cessation Service nurse, and she had many different plans, for young mothers she would explain the harm they were doing to their child, for young women she found that explaining the damage that smoking did to their complexion did wonders, but blokes are tougher, vanity and babies are not really an issue, so she set men a goal - what do you most want to buy, a boat, a new carbon fishing rod, a new dSLR, something that costs a couple of grand - then they put a fiver a day, or whatever their habit cost, into a box and after 12 months they've got at least £1,500 to buy a treat...

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ams4127

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I smoked for 50 years.

Last July I decided that enough was enough. I stopped and haven't had one since the day I retired.

No patches, no doctor's help.

No cravings or anything. I am now very much fitter, dropped 4 stone in weight and playing far better golf.

My only advice is to stay clear of places where you used to smoke.

Good luck!

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spuds

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Reading some of the comments, perhaps all it needs is a young child's thought of wisdom?.

In my earlier post, I mentioned about people that I knew who had stopped smoking. One case was a elderly neighbour of mine, who had smoked all her life, and her son's regular visits to France were keeping her in full supply.

One day the grand-daughter was visiting, and she told her grandma that she wasn't going to visit her again, because every time she left her grandma's house, she smelled of smoke. That did it, the grandma/neighbour threw all her supplies away, and as never smoked since. But I have noticed the sherry as taken a little pounding since!.

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chub_tor

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I smoked for about 20 years and only gave up because a 3 week spell in hospital with a bleeding stomach ulcer made me do so. I had no intention of quitting but my wife would not bring me any and nor would she give me enough money to buy any. After 3 weeks without fags I had no desire to start again but for the first year after quitting I dreamed nearly every night that I was lighting up. Visits to the pub were hell as all my mates were smoking and I really longed for that early morning and after dinner drag but I saw it through and have now been smoke-less for more years than I was a smoker. Stick to it carver and you will not regret it, the best of luck to you.

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Aitchbee

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My sister and my mum were both trying to give up smoking.(40 years ago).

They both said that 'they would give me £10' if I ever saw them smoking a cigarette.

One night, I hid behind a display cabinet, in the living-room, and caught both of them. It was hard not to laugh... but I got the £20, for my diligence!

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morddwyd

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Like chub_tor I gave up as an indirect result of illness.

I picked up a hospital acquired infection which put me in bed without a fag for three weeks, and and knew that at the age of 60 after twenty or more a day since I was eleven I'd be a fool to light another one.

If it was down to will power I'd have failed so you're a better man than I am.

One step at a time, whether that step be the next cigarette, the next hour or the next day.

Forget all the rubbish about being better off, healthier, food tasting better - I am no better off and my food tastes just as good, and I don't feel any healthier.

However, and here's the rub, I know I am the healthier for stooping, even if I don;t feel it.

Good luck with your struggle.

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