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Drought in England is official...what is the solution to this natural phenomenon?


Aitchbee

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The lack of rain has meant reservoirs are at their lowest levels for 35 years.

Can 'the North' help 'the South' ?

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amonra

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Birmingham has been drinking water from Wales for many a long year. The city realised quite early on that their groundwater supplies were not adequate and wisely spent their money on a pipeline from mid Wales. Unfortunately I think Wales was "conned" with a one-off payment, and no annual fee for the amount of water taken. Still, it was a good idea on somebody's part, well before it's time.

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Aitchbee

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Perhaps, lassooing a small iceberg and tugging it down to 'the Wash', would provide enough fresh water (and ice cubes), in time for the London Olympics.

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morddwyd

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FE

You're quite right, of course, I hadn't thought it through.

I had quite forgotten that you had privatised supplies in England, thereby allowing fat cat bosses to get big bonuses for earning their shareholders a good dividend by charging people exorbitant prices for this essential of life!.

However, like the rail, gas and electric companies, if they can't fulfil the terms of their franchise it should be taken off them.

Oh Dear! We're back at political will again.

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Bingalau

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I remember before the war my dad saying "The next thing you know, they will be charging us for the rain that drops free from the sky". I think he was filling in his tax form at the time.

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Forum Editor

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morddwyd

"I had quite forgotten that you had privatised supplies in England"

Not just in England.

Water supplies in Wales were privatised in 1989 and are now handled by Glas Cymru, a private company with no shareholders and no government involvement. Scottish Water is of course responsible to the Scottish parliament, although non-household customers can choose from four licenced retail suppliers. These suppliers are private companies.

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Chegs ®™

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I live on the edge of the Lake District so hosepipe bans are rare,and even when a ban is in place I still see people using hosepipes & wonder just how often someone gets prosecuted for flouting the ban.I've also noticed reports of burst water mains increased a couple of years ago(playing havoc with traffic because the affected roads were closed)As for the list of properties posted earlier in this thread stated "those with a bath" I have to point out that I've had 2 shower units fail (4 if you include the 2 replacements I was given to try after the last one failed the instant I turned the stopcock back on)because the water pressure is so great that the various fixtures within the shower unit exploded as the plastic wasn't strong enough to withstand the pressure.We've also had umpteen visits to fix the central heating boiler as the pressure destroys components within the boiler housing.Thats the major disadvantage to living at the bottom of a valley(I seem to recall reading that some of the houses on the estate are about 70ft below sea level)

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morddwyd

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Living at the bottom of a valley has little to do with water pressure. Even on top of a hill the water pressure is enough to send a jet from a fire hydrant high into the air.

There are pressure reducing valves in the system to reduce this pressure to domestic levels, just like electricity and gas, and your water company needs to adjust these.

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Forum Editor

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"Living at the bottom of a valley has little to do with water pressure. Even on top of a hill the water pressure is enough to send a jet from a fire hydrant high into the air."

The height of a property can actually have a considerable effect on domestic mains water pressure; properties at the top of a hill may receive a lower-pressure supply than those at the bottom. Static head water pressure varies by about 1 bar for every ten metres of height. Pressure can also vary according to the height of the top of the water level in the reservoir that supplies your property. Some domestic supplies are pumped from the water treatment works, but many are not. Flow resistance in domestic supply pipes can also have a marked effect on pressure at the tap, especially in rural areas, where there may be long pipe runs from a main to individual properties. Some of these pipe runs can be over a mile long.

Water companies have a statutory obligation to maintain a minimum pressure, equivalent to seven metres of static head, in the supply pipe to domestic properties.

If you have abnormally high pressure on the domestic main supply you can buy a variety of pressure-reducing devices. Prices vary considerably, but a good one with a facility to handle inlet pressures of up to 31 bar will cost around £150.

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Input Overload

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I don't see issues where one part of the country should feel aggrieved at supplying water to another.

For many years in Derbyshire & Nottinghamshire we had to put up with slag heaps from mines in almost every town or village, some mines tipped up to 2 million tones of aggressive waste a year on these heaps, there also were often on fire for many years.

Also the huge amount of coal moved by rail & road to supply the many trent-side power stations which burned 10,000 tons + of coal a day each. There were a blot on the landscape to supply electricity to other parts of the country perhaps that maybe supply drinking water to cities.

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Bapou

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Kielder Water in Northumberland was originally built to supply new industry expected on Teesside many years ago. This development never happened so we ended up with a lake for sailing , fishing and wonderful walks by the lake.

In recent years of drought in the South water was transported from Kielder, no doubt the same will be happening again. What was once described as a white elephant turned out a god send for other parts of the country.

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