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Snow snow, here we go.


Blackhat

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Just started in Birmingham, however, we are forecast rain for Sunday so it may not last long. According to BBC Weather we are due about 4 inches. If this is all we get this winter then we will have had a lucky escape compared to the last few winters.

Anyone having it bad?

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Quickbeam

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Almost all gone now, not like last year's 5 weeks of white roads.

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morddwyd

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WTM

Gripping stuff, no pun intended.

Found your "I had spun the wheels so much that I had clocked up 107 kilometers! " interesting.

What would have happened if this had occurred at a critical time on your tacho?

Would such reasoning be accepted?

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Aitchbee

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Persistant FOG, in the Glasgow area, is forecast for the early hours of monday, and might affect 'the M8 corridor'...a busy thoroughfare at the best of times.

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Aitchbee

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...it's crystal clear at the moment, in Glasgow.

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ams4127

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Playing golf today on Anglesey. 8 deg C. Sun shining, beautiful day. And I won! Can't get much better than that.

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Forum Editor

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john bunyan

The de-icing fluid is definitely glycol - no salt involved, it would damage the environment, and the aircraft. Heathrow has special vehicles that suck up excess glycol and re-use it, so that large quantities don't get into the ecosystem.

Heathrow is actually the world's busiest airport in terms of international flights. Many people believe that night flights are banned, but that's not the case.

Between 11:30 p.m.and 6:00 a.m.the airport operates on a supplementary points quota basis that scores all aircraft types on the noise they make when taking off and landing. Heathrow is allocated a maximum number of night points for winter and summer nights, and within that quota less noisy aircraft movements can take place during the restricted night period.

Because of these movements the runways are never empty for very long, although it's obviously easier to schedule de-icing runs for the vehicles at those times.

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WhiteTruckMan

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morddwyd - It did! (and I'm hoping so)

WTM

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john bunyan

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FE. Maybe , in the long term, the answer to all this would be to go for the "Boris Island" new big hub in the Thames estuary, and build with the knowledge gained at Heathrow.Expensive but the value of the Heathrow site must be enormous. As a frequent flyer, what do you think? (Maybe this should be in a seperate thread)

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Forum Editor

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john bunyan

It's a highly contentious issue.

What is pretty obvious is that Heathrow operates at around 98% of its maximum capacity for most of the time - on average there are 1300 flights scheduled to arrive or depart every day. What's badly needed is another runway, but that doesn't look likely to happen, given the vehemence of the opposition to the idea.

The problem is a huge one,and its solution is very important as far as our economy is concerned - we need to remain an internationally important hub for business travellers, tourists, and cargo.

Around 60% of all arriving flights are held in the air prior to landing, and this means cost. The Air Traffic Control Service has produced figures which show that aircraft are circling the airport for a cumulative 55 hours a day. This equates to 190 tonnes of fuel being burned, and the discharge of 600 tonnes of co2 into the skies above London. The wasted fuel cost alone is around £119,000 every day. At the daily late-morning peak time people in London and the surrounding countryside have between 30 and forty big jets circling over their heads, stacked, waiting for clearance to land. It's a miracle of air-traffic control, and the wonder is that there aren't more near-miss events or accidents.

An answer is the one you mentioned - a four-runway airport in the Thames Estuary - but don't hold your breath.

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