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Terms of Endearment? (love; Babe; Hun; etc.)


Bingalau
Resolved

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I really can't believe that a woman down south demanded an apology because a bus driver had called her "Babe". I think it was in the Brighton area. If that is all she has to worry about in life then God help her. Then on this morning's BBC News program a so called etiquette expert backed her up. Is there a shortage of news?

Maybe there are people who read this forum who think like her? Perhaps I was brought up wrongly, but expressions such as Chuck; Queen; Luv; make me feel that I am back home again. I also quite liked being called "my beautie" or "my bird" etc when I was in the west country, or "Hen" when I was in Geordie land.

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spuds

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(Bremner)"We all must accept that things that were perfectly acceptable years ago are no longer so"(FE)" I couldn't put it better than that".

But why must it be like that?.

Why should it be that there is lack of respect by some of our younger generation for our older generation, or even our guardians of safety?.

But going back on the original subject. I have read two newspaper reports today on this story, and in the main it would appear that the whole thing as been received as a fairly negative issue.

My own local newspaper did a town centre survey, and the women (age 16 to 60) that were interviewed seemed on the whole to be willing to accept praises of endearment, but some gave a slight objection to being called 'babe', except if it was from a boyfriend or some one close to them. One 20 year old student, even suggested that females would be frightened to go on buses, if the driver said it in 'a sexist way'!.

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morddwyd

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"Are you seriously suggesting it is pointless to make a stand for what you believe in?"

I believe the same sort of stand was made when it was first postulated (within living memory) that women should get the vote.

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Quickbeam

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That's not quite the same thing as this thread has shown, terms of endearment are used by, and towards both sexes. They're something that work both ways.

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rickf

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I guess " babe" has a derogatry conotation whereas the traditonal terms such as luv,chuck, sunshine acquired a different meaning.When I first came to the UK in the early 60's I was made to feel very accepted when a bus driver, conductor etc., called me luv. In some ways the so called 21st century has gone mad particularly in English speaking countries where PC seems to rule most aspects of life and where tradition is not upheld as in other countries. All the poorer culturally, I think.

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Quickbeam

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I quite agree with that sentiment rickf, it would be a very boring country if we all spoke in prim Edwardian English, 'Good day to you sir - may I be of help Madam? - excuse me kindly Sir...', that's just not real language anymore.

Regional differences are part of our unique identity and as such should be protected and prized. I mentioned earlier that by the time I'd left school, I'd lived in 6 very different UK regions, I look back on that as a cultural enrichment.

I was indifferent to the notion of terms of endearment at the start of this thread, now after reading the varying thoughts of PCA members, I accept that they are part of everyday communication, and should be seen as being as normal as someone that chooses to say thank you very much, thanks or plain ta, it's just the use of language, that's changing all the time anyway. Look at the text speak that's in use now pca M8s, terms of endearment are still running strong in the youth culture.

The babe in question needs to lighten up and learn how to react to modern day-today living without a lemon her gob!

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robgf

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One of the checkout girls in Asda always calls everyone, babe, or love. I like it, it makes a mundane task more cheerful and starts people chatting, rather than standing in silence.

I hate being called Sir, it makes me feel old and boring.

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Aitchbee

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robgf - Andy Williams' got it right when he begged "Call Me Irresponsible".

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robgf

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AitchBEE you're going back a bit there, would you like to meet my mum. ;)

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spuds

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Cannot hang around to long, I have three letters of complaint to write. Just been into three local shop's and I was spoken to in the most uncouth way. I was actually referred to, as sweetheart, luv and youth.

Oh it does make you so angry. What's the world coming to?.

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Bingalau

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spuds. You would be better just printing off a lot of copies of one standard letter. I haven't been to anywhere in this country without being insulted in this way either. I've been called a flower in Cornwall, a bird in Devon, and darling in a film studio in one of those posh southern counties. Oh yes some cheeky Yank on a golf course in Florida, called me "Bubba". Now that is really pushing the limits.

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