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Can Employer change my contracted days/hours?


Cara2
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My employer (a large, nationwide retail company) is in the consultation period of changing contracted hours/days to include Saturdays. Having never worked weekends, I feel this will impact on quality of family life.

As a part-time worker do I have to accept this change as a done deal or loose my job - or can I succeed in contesting this proposal?

Anybody faced a similiar situation? If so, what was the outcome?

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interzone55

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When I worked for Littlewoods most sales staff had their contracted hours dropped from 37.5 per week to 35 per week, all hell broke lose, but when we checked with the union we were told that the employer could alter our hours by up to 10% without the need for us to sign a new contract.

I can't imagine that much has changed in the last 15 years

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buteman

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I am sure if you have worked with the company for 22 years they would not want to loose you now.

Have a word with whoever is in charge to see if you could keep your normal work shift.

If not you would have to make the changes asked.

Not sure if you refused the request to change your work practice and you were made redundant whether you would indeed be entitled to 22 years redundancy payment.

Unless you have the chance of another job elsewhere I would stay put and accept the changes.

If you don't want to start working weekends maybe wait and see what redundancy payments that they are going to give you before you make up your mind.

If you change to the new hours and you no longer like the job and you decide to leave.Thats it you get nothing from them except a goodbye.

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spuds

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If consultations are in progress, then assume that the company is being forced into making changes for possible future survival. Whoever is the 'consulting parties', then those are the people to approach at the present time.

If there are possible redundancies in the making, then I do believe that the law on payments is due to change from February 2012. So it might pay to check this out.

Perhaps looking at the CAB or ACAS websites might provide some answers?.

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Woolwell

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Surprised that nobody has pointed out this Direct Gov - Changes to Employment Contracts.
This gives just about all of the up-to-date information required.

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Kevscar1

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Bremner I worked as a self-employed Book and Gift Distributter for a national company.

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Cara2

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Thanks for all advice given - I shall bear it all in mind.

The Direct Gov website, in particular, is very handy.

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rdave13

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Cara2. With respect about the Direct-Gov site then I'd take it with a pinch of salt. I've worked for my company for going on sixteen years, and at first it was a very caring company towards its employees. Part of the contract then for long term illness was four weeks full pay, following four weeks three quarters pay then statutory sick pay. This is just one part, obviously, taken as an example. Company taken over by a bigger fish and some slight contractual terms changed. Another bigger fish gobbled that one and now it is this for long term illness. If the Manager dislikes you, you go on to statutory sick pay after six days (if entitled). If manager has some respect for you then you may apply for a whole month's holiday from your annual entitlement then you go to the statutory sick pay. Its written in nice words in the contract but this is what it means in the real world. As employees we're stuffed unless you live and breathe the company today, unions or not, and they know it.

Rant over.

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spuds

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While we are talking about help and advice, I found on one occasion using two different ACAS offices, they didn't provide the same advice to myself and the other party!.

I have also found this with Trading Standards, so I suppose its the person you get and their method of working?.

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