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New Coins


Woolwell
Resolved

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There was a thread about this in 2010 (now locked) but the new steel coins are apparently being introduced this month. Stand by for snags and pockets full of coins that will not work New Coins

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morddwyd

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"payments by debit or credit card only (with a surcharge perhaps)?."

As the surcharge would be for a service, it would attract VAT at 20%.

Please don't put ideas in their heads.

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Forum Editor

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Condom

Research projects in various parts of the world have looked at the levels of pathogens on banknotes in circulation, and have come up with differing results. The consensus seems to be that most banknotes carry some bacteria, although very few are sufficiently contaminated to be of serious concern to the average healthy person, although a bout of diarrhoea isn't entirely out of the question. The most common contaminates are likely to be fecal matter and germs from the respiratory system.

Handling banknotes appears to pose no greater threat to general health than touching door handles or other peoples' computer keyboards. Increasingly, banknotes show traces of cocaine - enough to trigger a response from sniffer dogs in many cases. The wisest course of action, particularly in areas where standards of sanitation may not be as high as they might be, is to wash your hands as soon as possible after handling banknotes.

During a recent SARS scare one Chinese bank went as far as instructing its branches to hold incoming banknotes for at least 24 hours, and run them through an Ultra-violet steriliser before issuing them to counter customers. In some Japanese cities you can use special ATMs which pass you your money via a pair of heated rollers - hot enough to kill any germs, so they say.

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spuds

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Wasn't it mentioned a few years ago, that Australia was going to introduce a 'plastic' type paper note, that could be easily 'cleaned' and virtual germ resistant. The notes would also have a longer circulation period, before destruction. What ever happened to that idea?.

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Forum Editor

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spuds

"What ever happened to that idea?."

Currently all Australian banknotes are made from polypropylene polymer.

The first to be issued appeared in 1998, but there were technical problems. A complete new set of polymer notes began to be issued in 1992.

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Al94

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They were issued in Northern Ireland in the 80's when Northern Bank was owned by National Australia Bank http://tinyurl.com/6t7mlbk

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interzone55

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spuds

Canada has introduced polymer notes as well. I've got one of the Aussie notes somewhere, it's next to impossible to tear...

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WhiteTruckMan

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I still have a 'plastic' 50p manx note I get during a TT trip in the early 80's, so they have been out for a while now.

But back to the coins, I confess to some concern about the debasement of the currency that is going on. I have a dim recollection of being told about roman gold coins that were adulterated with base metals, and although issued by the authorities, were in fact so worthless that the tax collectors refused to accept them in payment for taxes due.

And extreme example, I know, but the difference is one of degree, not principle. The principle being confidence in the currency.

WTM

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Condom

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FE

After reading your comments I looked at the pile of money which her indoors returned to the UK with after her tour of the far east. I already knew about Australia but the new notes from there are a definate improvement on the earlier ones which I remember using. Singapore also has nice ones as does Brunei but the feel of the Australian notes seems best to me. In Thailand the 50 baht note is plastic but it tends to be shunned as it feels out of place. Perhaps it is the hotter climes which see the greater risk of contamination on notes. Another strange thing I noticed was the small size of all the notes. The Singapore currency actually looked bigger than the rest but it was an optical illusion as they were all the same size. Must be something to do with the design.

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interzone55

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When Canada brought out the polymer notes I remember reading a report that suggested the notes were of most use in sweatier climes where the notes are most in danger of falling apart in your back pocket - hence Australia, Singapore, Brunei etc

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Forum Editor

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"I confess to some concern about the debasement of the currency that is going on."

It's not really debasement, because our currency isn't backed up by gold bullion any more. There's no need (in fact it's undesirable) for coins to have a value that relates to the value of their metal content. What matters is that The Bank of England continues to honour the face value of coinage; provided it does that the coins can be made of anything.

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