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Should police forces employ officers with criminal records?


Flak999

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This is took me by surprise, I was under the impression that to be a police officer you should not have had a criminal past. Obviously not! An article in the Daily Telegraph states that nearly 1000 serving police officers and PCSO's have convictions ranging from burglary, causing death by careless driving, robbery, supplying drugs, domestic violence, forgery and perverting the course of justice.

Those with criminal records include senior officers, among them two detective chief inspectors and one chief inspector working for the Metropolitan Police.

Is this acceptable? Should those we look too to uphold the law be criminals themselves?

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Flak999

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Forum Editor

As I am sure you are aware there are some positions of employment where exemption from disclosure under the rehabilitation of offenders act does not apply. Police officers fall under this category, the act states:

**Exceptions To The Act: There are some situations in which people will be expected to declare their convictions, even if they are spent. (including but not exclusively) Appointment to any office or employment involving the administration of justice, including police officers, probation officers, traffic wardens.**

I do not believe that it is right that people who we look to to administer the law should be or have been criminals themselves. I feel it brings the law and the administration of justice into disrepute.

How does one trust a police officer who is a convicted drug dealer to fairly and impartially investigate and arrest others suspected of the same crime? It makes a mockery of the law and law enforcement in my opinion.

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spuds

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Flak999

Perhaps your last sentence above, might take into consideration possible serving officer's who may well be committing a crime or 'misdemeanour', to perhaps benefit themselves or others?.

A simple task of using information from a PNC check, can have dire results!.

Even the people doing 'Police Checks' (CRB) for certain organisations etc, are not actually the Police themselves,and are possibly deemed to be, but are a contracted-out agency?.

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Woolwell

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The CRB is not part of the police but part of the Home Office.

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spuds

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The CRB are under the 'umbrella' of the Home Office, but are a 'contracted-out' agency, run by a private company.

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Woolwell

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I think that you will find that the chief executive is Steve Long a civil servant and that is run in partnership with Capita. What is likely to happen is that CRB and ISA will merge into the Disclosure and Barring Service and may be run by a private company. That could be of concern.

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bremner

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Cautions and spent convictions will be disclosed on standard and enhanced CRB checks but not on a basic check.

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