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Speakers Corner


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Should we all be more tolerant to bad language?


TopCat®
Resolved

Likes # 0

Well I'll nail my colours to the mast and state categorically that bad language really offends me a lot, more especially if the verbal abuse is issued under a threat. Does anyone here fully agree with Judge Bean's findings in this judgement? TC. the verdict

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Woolwell

Likes # 1

Swearing often indicates a lack of vocabulary. Some GI's didn't swear but their descriptions were quite graphic. I think that this judge was incorrect.

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Bingalau

Likes # 1

When I was a public house manager, as you can imagine swearing was the norm in many pubs. But I managed to limit it to the public bar area. In the other three areas of the pub, I managed to stop customers from swearing and this in turn encouraged a lot more customers to return to the pub. It increased takings and the atmosphere improved all round with a better class of customer too in the shape of families etc.

So it has always been obvious to me that swearing is not welcomed by lots of people. Pity it has become commonplace in most films and TV productions these days. I turn it off if I can, but sometimes it is either too late or impossible.

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Forum Editor

Likes # 0

Swear words have their place in our language - that's always been the case. The problem arises - in my view - when swear words are used so often in the course of normal conversation that they become devalued. Use word 'A' frequently enough and you'll soon have to step up to word 'B', and so on.

It can be offensive to make the assumption that others will tolerate the use of swear words in everyday conversations, and of course these words should never be used as weapons - telling a total stranger to #%*+~ off is to invite trouble.

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marvin42

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To misquote Isaac Asimov (Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent) - Obscenity is the first resort of the illiterate.

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QuizMan

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If I'm honest I might let out the occasional expletive to myself when I am on my own, like this morning when my greenhouse door jammed with me on the inside.

However you would never catch me mouthing off in public. What concerns me more is the way it is now considered to be normal conversation. Whenever I travel by train, for example, it is difficult NOT to here other people's conversations and the use of the f word as an adjective in now commonplace without a thought from the speaker about whom they might offend.

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Woolwell

Likes # 0

The world I prefer is without racial abuse, the mocking and without the strong language.

There is no need to use strong language in public. It seems too that many TV programmes have strong language in them that doesn't add to the plot or to the characterisation. It seemed to have been brought from across the Atlantic.

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sunnystaines

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NO, good manners cost nothing. it is mainly the slang family types that are too lazy to work and scrounge benefits that use swear words in their everyday talk because no one has ever taught them manners in either family or school life.

that is why in my opinion all schools should enforce good disciple and manners. The same in the work place.

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TopCat®

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Woolwell

I'm of the opinion that many of our 'ills' came across from there, aided in no small way I would think by the rapid globalisation of this world.

Getting back to the topic of bad language, I well remember walking down London's Tottenham Court Road in the late 50's. I'd been posted to Regents Park Barracks and by then was well used to hearing profanities from the troops.

What caused me to remember that particular sunny day was the sight of two gorgeous, well dressed young ladies coming towards me. I could see they were happily chatting away to each other but what stunned me, as we drew near, was the amount and variety of foul expletives that was leaving their lips. As we passed by there came a moment or two of silence as they noticed my shocked expression, but soon carried on as before.

That was the first time I'd heard women really swear and as a young 23 year old unattached guy, they seemed to lose some of their mystery and magic. Even to this day I wince and cringe when I hear girls of any age swearing. TC.

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wee eddie

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I have to admit to having chucked people out of my Taxi, for using Offensive language.

While they can, in my opinion, swear among themselves to their heart's delight. I can see no reason why they should swear at me, question my Parentage or, describe me as anything other than a white Anglo Saxon male.

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finerty

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You know TC its wrong for the BBC to send out the wrong info, go into a bank and swear and c what happens.

Swearing may be part of life yet what bout our young children, what kind of message r u sending out.

What would you do when your grand child swears at you.

The Police also need to clean up their own home too, there are number of officers who do swear.

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