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Idiotic rules over photography


interzone55

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Man questioned by police for photographing his daughter

A man was approached by shopping centre security, and then questioned by police, for taking photographs of his daughter at an Ice Cream parlour in a shopping centre.

Apparently they have a No Photography policy to "protect the privacy of staff and shoppers", which is rubbish as the place will be crawling with CCTV, so the only place you'll get privacy is the toilets.

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interzone55

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bremner

It's not a non-story.

Let's break it down

1) Lots of people have been reported to the police for taking photographs of their own children. I can't remember her name, but there was a news reader arrested a while back after a photo developers reported her to the police over pictures of her young daughter in the bath. Just like the householders who are afraid to defend their homes and family due to fear of arrest, parents should not be afraid of being branded paedophiles simply for photographing their children.

2) Photographing famous buildings. Many police forces have been in the habit of arresting people for photographing famous buildings, ostensibly under the Prevention of Terrorism act. Again, this has to stop, and the Met have finally admitted they shouldn't be treating everyone as a terrorist suspect.

3) Shopping centres banning photography under "privacy" grounds. If your premises are already covered with CCTV no one has any privacy outside a toilet cubicle, so their argument has no merit. Providing you are not photographing things like security staff, camera positions or building exits I can't see how taking the odd photograph inside a shopping centre can be a security concern (and that's the real reason they don't like photography).

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Woolwell

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It is not an offence to take photos in a public place so what is the point of asking and who would you ask anyway? Obviously photographs of children is a very sensitive area and rightly so. It is best to avoid photos of children other than your own unless permission has been given. Shopping malls are not public places and have their own rules and many, if not all, do not permit photography.

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Aitchbee

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Is being on a public bus or train, a public place...or is it private, or neither?Would I ask the driver if it was ok to take some photographs or should I ask for a show of hands from the other passengers?

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bremner

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No police force has ever arrested a person for taking pictures in a public place.

Individual officers have wrongly used the terrorism act because they were poorly trained. All forces have issued clear guidelines to their officers that this must not happen.

The story is a non story because the man was taking pictures where it was clearly stated that it was not permitted. It does not matter what you or I think of the ban, it is private property and the public only have access if they abide by any rules set by those who run the establishment.

The story makes out that the person was been stopped because it was he was photographing his child - not true - so a non story.

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Aitchbee

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Is a public house, private property?

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Aitchbee

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bremner - I agree with you. If rules are set down, then you must obey them.

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Woolwell

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AitchBEE - Ever heard of common sense? It should be fairly obvious where you can freely take photos and where you cannot and who you take photos of and who you do not.

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cycoze

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The law allows for photography in most public space, Braehead shopping centre however is not a public space it is owned by Capital Shopping Centres, they can make their own on-site rules, the photographer ignored the rules and caused the problem.

The security man asking the photographer to delete the images was wrong to do so, in exactly the same way a Police officer should not ask you to delete your images, it is evidence!

If you are trespassing or asked to leave you are required to do so, the security have no right to confiscate your camera, the police do though if they believe that you are up to something nefarious( that probably would entail getting arrested too), again any images would be evidence.

Regards asking permission in public places, try shooting a couple of thousand images a week in public and asking permission every-time, you will soon end up with a dry mouth and sore throat! agreed being polite is always the best way to behave, but unless your taking close ups of kids whose parent may object, then a lot of wasted time and loss of spontaneity.

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Pine Man

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AitchBEE

You seem to have missed my point completely. Have it your own way - you usually do ;-)

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interzone55

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bremner

No police force has ever arrested a person for taking pictures in a public place.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/feb/21/photographer-films-anti-terror-arrest

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