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Speakers Corner


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Ebay Disclaimer


Quickbeam
Resolved

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As I have mentioned recently, I am offloading accumulated clutter from over the years. My garage contains loads of bike parts, is it OK to put any sort of disclaimer on an Ebay item?

This is what I have in mind, feel free to advise, I know I'm no diplomat:)

DISCLAIMER:

Please be aware that these motorcycle parts listed by myself are sold as described and shown in the photos. The boxes that they are in, along with the quoted part No cannot be guaranteed as correct as I have found out myself in the past. My description is as true as I believe, but as an old bike restorer, you may know different, in which case, I bow to superior knowledge. This is a garage clearout, some bits have been there for 30+ years.

Take a good look at the photos of any item you intend to bid on, and use your own discretion and personal knowledge as you would at an auto jumble. Once you buy it, it’s yours, if it’s not right, tough... buyer beware!

No offence meant by the above disclaimer, but there is bound to be someone that thinks the world is perfect...

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Quickbeam

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Blackhat

I will take that on board, I had one last week that couldn't find the funds after 8 days.

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dagbladet

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I'd leave out the buyer beware bit altogether. 'beware' of what?, What's wrong with it? Not sure it's any kind of legal wording. Just comes across to me that in the previous paragraph you had been open and honest about your stuff, then added a 'kop out' with the last two words. Just my opinion. 'Part no' seems fine in this context. the kind of folk that would be interested in your stuff will know what a part no is. Think about your postage as well. If you sell to Eire, NI or the Highlands and Islands it is a fair bit dearer to send.

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Forum Editor

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I recommend that somewhere in your disclaimer you say:-

"Items are sold without warranty, express or implied."

Quite frankly, that's about all you need to say. Disclaimers are best kept brief and to the point - the more waffle you include, the more you are likely to deter potential buyers. Don't say anything about 'buyer beware' it's a relatively meaningless statement in this context. Don't say anything in the description of the goods that isn't true and verifiable - let buyers make up their own minds about what you're offering.

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Quickbeam

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I was thinking too much waffle too, only in my mind I didn't call it that:)

I'll be putting some of them on over the weekend.

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spuds

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If you can offer a facility to inspect before end of auction, then do so. Also suggest that you will try to answer any questions on the items that you are offering. By doing the two mentioned, you are at least offering to provide further information as 'true as possible, and within your limits'.

Some people put No Returns as a disclaimer, but eBay/PayPal will usually provide a dispute and refund procedure, if the item is described incorrectly.

If you put a disclaimer that eBay doesn't like or a subscriber complains about, then eBay will most probably remove the disclaimer or advert, with a warning to follow.

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Quickbeam

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Just to wind up the tread, this is what I plumped for.

Take a good look at the pictures, it is exactly what you see, a genuine part in need of some restoration. Items are sold without warranty, express or implied. Use your own discretion as you would at an autojumble, this is not a new part.

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LanceAlot

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Replace 'tough' with 'hard cheese' and that ought to do it.

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Quickbeam

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Tough titty's more my style:)

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spuds

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"Take a good look at the pictures, it is exactly what you see".

I had that once, when someone sold me a radio receiver with a cracked glass dial,and other defects that didn't show up in the photograph. On contacting the seller after receiving the item, and noticing that and the other faults, I was informed "They should have shown up on the photograph, if it hadn't you should have emailed me, before you made a bid". The item in that case, was described and sold as 'very good condition'.

The disclaimer above at least seems true to understand!.

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Quickbeam

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spuds,

It's a sign of the times, 30 years ago you wouldn't have to spell everything out so clearly. But old parts that need some restoration to make them serviceable are always going to be in demand to keep older vehicles running. I've even bought parts in the past just as a pattern to have a new item made up.

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