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Expensive Repair or New Boiler?


Cara2

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My boiler is around 12 years old and now needs an expensive repair of around £451 (in addition to the £70 odd pounds a service and fault finding session has cost).

Does anyone have any advice which way to go with this? What would you do? I can run to a new boiler although I would have to put other important things on hold for a while.

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Quickbeam

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I still like to have a tank with an immersion heater fitted for those emergencies, or if you've used all the hot water between timings it heats it up quickly.

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Crosstrainer2

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Quickbeam

My boiler is a combi, so produces hot water on demand. The cupboard where the huge copper tank used to reside is now full to the brim with old computer kit :)) (....Really must get round to clearing it out!)

My CH system has a timing system, but I don't use it. It has a wireless thermostatic transmitter which I pre-set to the desired temperature.

Each room has independent controls for each radiator, so I only switch the heating off if I'm away (even then I turn it down low in case of freeze ups)

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Quickbeam

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Crosstrainer2

Yes, there is no doubt that modern system are far better than only a few years ago, my combi comment was based on what was around when the last system I had put in 17 years ago. I won't be far off having to spend some money on a new one too. Are new combis OK for running baths now?

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Crosstrainer2

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They are now....I have a walk in shower, but the friend who got me my boiler has said he used to have to wait ages for the old one to heat up got fill the bath.

They are not high pressure, but the water is so hot (and constant) that filling a bath wouldn't be an issue.

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johndrew

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I would suggest two other points for when the new boiler is installed: 1. Make certain the whole system is flushed properly and a cleaner and inhibitor are applied. This will reduce the chance of problems from particulate floating around in the system even though some have a filter as part if the installation. 2. If going for a combi again, have a water filter installed in the mains inlet to it. This will, at least, reduce scaling in the domestic water heater and should increase the life of the unit.

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al's left peg

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Most new combi's fittted now come with an in line inhibitor/filter fitted. It's called a Magnaclean, it might come as an option at a cost of £100, but it is definately worth putting on.

My friend works for BG and he says great things about them so I would recommend you get one fitted. I think it works as an inline filter constantly within the system cleaning carbon and impurities out that damage the heat exchanger. I also think it is a removable piece of kit that owner periodically cleans to keep it working efficiently.

Hope this helps! Al.

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JYPX

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Am I correct in thinking that a Combi boiler requires the whole system to be under modest pressure? Does this mean that a Combi Boiler would not be a good match for an older set of radiators currently causing no problems with a coventional boiler? Hope that made sense....

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oresome

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JYPX

A conventional heating system is pressurised from the height of the expansion tank in the loft.

The alternative with a closed system is an inflatable diaphragm within the boiler which probably is set to a similar pressure.

I think the operating temperatures of the two sytems are different and thus the radiator sizes may need recalculating.

Confession......Not a plumber or heating engineer!

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Forum Editor

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JYPX

A combi boiler that's connected to a set of radiators that were installed to work with a conventional boiler usually causes no problems. Occasionally leaks can occur on compression joints on copper piping if they were not sufficiently tightened when fitted, and occasionally old radiators can start to leak where the valve tail enters the radiator. That's the point on the radiator where corrosion commonly starts to show on old radiators.

In the main, conversions from a conventional boiler to a combi go without any hitches. The combi system will be pressurised to between 1.0 and 1.5 bar, and this shouldn't result in any problems on a properly installed set of radiators.

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JYPX

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Thank you.

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