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Solar panels and storage heaters


Colonel Graham

Likes # 1

I'm hopefully having solar panels fitted shortly. It occurs to me if I put a small storage heater in the conservatory, it would charge during the day and release the heat on a winters evening.

Is this practical?

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Diemmess

Likes # 0

As this thread has shown, there is a passing resemblance to Double Glazing salesman in some companies' misleading sales pitch.

kev100 is giving very thorough advice and information and showing the variations in schemes that are available.

These variations are supposed to offer something to suit all pockets but the cowboys are already cobbling the cheapest options to suit their greed. If ever there was a need to read the small print, deal only with properly registered firms, and seek word of mouth recommendations from people whose opinion you value, this is the time.

I have gone the route where I buy the installation outright with one payment. The installers have left me with certificates of microgeneration registration and building regulations electrical certificate.

This brings the greatest financial return and the licenced installation remains as a fixture which stays with the house whoever is the owner.

Once I had decided on which firm to use, there was a downloaded self survey to be returned, checking the viability of the project. Which way was the roof orientated, was there any shadow from trees or buildings, what was the roof age/condition and what sort of mains electricity connection did I use. Then their own surveyor called, measured and checked for himself - no fee.

One snag which must be avoidable with prior knowledge. The installers applied for registration the day they completed. I missed a window to apply to Npower to use the thing. by the time I had received a returnable (by post) application form, Npower had loftily dismissed the idea of paying me for the first month's generation. They played the rules is rules gambit and the date they received my proper application is the one that counts. (I've checked with Ofgem and no redress)

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Aitchbee

Likes # 0

Radio4's moneybox is having a chat about 'green energy' for anybody interested. WEDNESDAY 5TH October 2011. 3pm.

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woodchip

Likes # 0

Change all your lighting to twelve volts then you would save some money

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Bingalau

Likes # 0

I think at my age I would be wasting my money, because I would go for the buying outright option. So I will just have to put up with paying an arm and a leg for power as I always have done.

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Aitchbee

Likes # 0

Last week, while travelling on the upper-deck of a 31 bus Glasgow - East Kilbride, I noticed that some of the bus-shelters had solar cells, built in to the roofs.Why can't the buses have them fitted also?

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Graham*

Likes # 0

The solar panels being fitted generate 2.9Kw in full sun. That's more than enough to 'charge' a storage heater. Instead of wiring to an economy 7 feed from the meter, I will simply fit a plug.

Bit of a rush on now, ahead of the (proposed)reduction in the FIT after 12th December. Most of the 'free' installations will disappear.

woodchip you don't have access to the 12V from the panels, that is fed directly to an inverter.

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Forum Editor

Likes # 0

AitchBEE

Buses have engines which generate their electrical power - why would they want solar cells?

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Aitchbee

Likes # 0

FE - I noticed that some of the Firstbus buses now have free WI-FI internet access.

My thinking was, that the solar panels might be used to power this feature, or, possibly used to power charging sockets, if these were also incorporated into the bus...for charging laptops or other devices.

There would be no drain on the bus's main battery.

Same panels could be used on coach buses.

When vehicles have their engines turned off, this might be useful.

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Aitchbee

Likes # 0

...in addition, the installation of roof-top solar panels on buses...(the whole roof area of the bus), would help to keep the bus cool, on very hot days in summer.(The heat of the sun being absorbed by the panels). When the buses were taken into the depots,usually overnight...the unused electricity could be used for the cleaning of the buses, or perhaps, actually power smaller electric buses, on off-peak passenger times of the day, and night.

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dagbladet

Likes # 0

"When the buses were taken into the depots,usually overnight...the unused electricity could be used for the cleaning of the buses, or perhaps, actually power smaller electric buses, on off-peak passenger times of the day, and night."

That's brilliant!...How exactly does it work again?

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