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Do you think the police cuts should be reconsidered?


bremner

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Today on the World at One Kenneth Clarke reiterated the goverments case for cutting police budgets.

He said that policing was in major need of a root and branch reform, with which I generally agree. He added that they wanted police officers out of offices and on the streets, meaning that overall number of officer could be cut without reducing the number of frontline police. Great, but he then said the jobs being done by the police officers in offices could then be done by civilian staff.

My local force is having to cut 700 police officers AND 500 civilian posts.

Something therefore does not add up.

Why can't the government simply be honest. They need to balance the books, policing must take its pain like every public service but please please don't say there will be no noticeable reduction in frontline officers.

The emperor has no clothes.

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spuds

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bremner

I am pleased that you have linked to that report, because I think it points out to concerns about the role of PCSO's and how some forces were/are using that resource.

Funding is separate (as you have stated) as are pension arrangements, in this civilian role, as were police employed Traffic Wardens. When the local constabularies Traffic Warden service ceased, part of that police budget was transferred to other sections, because at the 'trial period' Central Government bore most of the cost for PCSO's. Not sure of the figures now, but I think the mention of 16.000 PCSO's would be initially recruited when Blunkett brought the idea out, years thereafter?.

I think some police chiefs were met with the 'two for one' thought on revenue commitments. Employ two PCSO's for the price of one Police Officer, but it reality it as never turned out like that!.

Perhaps I shouldn't say this, but the public always seems to have a view, that police (or uniform) presence in an area brings confidence and security?.

Whatever the case, most police forces and council's plus other public services are saying that they they are struggling to provide a service, unless funding is increased!.

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bremner

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Spuds

I think politicians see things this way.

Reported crime is down, yet the public perceive they are in danger of being victims of crime.

The public perceive that if they see a uniform be it a PC, Special or PCSO they are less likely to be a victim of crime, ergo lets employ PCSO's as they get much less training and lower pay so are much cheaper.

Chief Constables had no say in the number of PCSO's it was set by the Home Office, however as the report says some were "reminded" that their use was for frontline i.e. visible.

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Chegs ®™

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In an attempt to reduce crime in our local hospital,someone decided to employ the services of cardboard cutouts of a police officer.Perhaps the "no cuts to frontline services" will mean this idea being broadened to include cardboard cutouts of police officers on every street corner.

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T0SH

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I get the impression from reading the recent news that David Cameron has already solved the police cuts problem by calling up the cavelry by importing a retired super cop from America (at god only knows what cost to us the taxpayers ?)

But perhaps this will like most of his other mainly (plagerised)ideas will no doubt go off like a damp squib

Cheers HC

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bremner

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I can see no reason why we should not seek advice from someone who has a track record of dealing with inner city gangs that make ours look like a WI meeting.

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john bunyan

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In the USA all police are armed and have no hesitation at opening fire in a gang war situation, nor in some cases of looting. If you look at all the furore over the recent police shooting of a suspect, I wonder how far reccomendations from this US expert will be relevant to the UK scenario. Mind you I am not objecting to the Government seking his views.

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john bunyan

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flycatcher1

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bremner

Easy - via NHS, The Tory Party, Labour, The Coalition and Coulson. All seasoning to the pot.

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morddwyd

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fm

I am using amateur as the antonym of professional, i.e. it is not their profession, it is not how they earn their living.

bremner's definition has it exactly right "a person who engages in a study, sport, or other activity for pleasure rather than for financial benefit"

Specials, so far as I can remember, do not get paid, other than expenses, and while I think Terriers do get a remuneration, I hardly think any of them do it for "financial benefit".

They probably don't do it for "pleasure" either, in the normal sense, more like a sense of duty, but they certainly don't do it as a profession.

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bremner

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A Special or member of the TA is in my view a professional, remuneration is irrelevant.

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