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Do you think the police cuts should be reconsidered?


bremner

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Today on the World at One Kenneth Clarke reiterated the goverments case for cutting police budgets.

He said that policing was in major need of a root and branch reform, with which I generally agree. He added that they wanted police officers out of offices and on the streets, meaning that overall number of officer could be cut without reducing the number of frontline police. Great, but he then said the jobs being done by the police officers in offices could then be done by civilian staff.

My local force is having to cut 700 police officers AND 500 civilian posts.

Something therefore does not add up.

Why can't the government simply be honest. They need to balance the books, policing must take its pain like every public service but please please don't say there will be no noticeable reduction in frontline officers.

The emperor has no clothes.

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Quickbeam

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They've been talking about civilians doing work that doesn't require a police officer status for decades, so it makes sense that they're actually doing something in that direction.

But I remain sceptical that the freed up trained police officers will become extra police on the beat.

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ams4127

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That seems to me to be a pretty good incentive for the government to make sure that what it says will happen, happens.

Chance, I fear, would be a fine thing!

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Forum Editor

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"Chance, I fear, would be a fine thing!"

The point being made by fourm member seems to me to be valid. If the government says there will be no cuts in frontline services, and is subsequently shown to have reneged on that promise, the electorate will have its revenge, come election day.

Only a fool would make a promise like that and then break it, especially in the context of the current public order situation.

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rdave13

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Forum Editor,

Only a fool would make a promise like that and then break it, especially in the context of the current public order situation.

Reminds me of the time you called the previous PM a fool.

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spuds

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My local constabulary as not had a recruitment drive for police officer's for over two years, and any police officer that as left on grounds of ill health, retirement, transfer etc hasn't been replaced.

The same applies for the civilian side, and quite a few have seen their jobs either changed, disappeared or their reduced contracts have now been terminated or due for possible revision shortly. Scenes of crime officers that were increased a few years ago, have also seen reductions in their ranks over the past year or so. I have two friends who both hold civilian jobs, having left the role of police officer's. They have both been told that their 'administration' jobs are under consideration, and may not be there within the next few months, twelve months at the latest.

So one may wonder how all the 'pass onto civilians' is going to work. Perhaps the latest drive for 'Special Constables' is the name of the game. We already have volunteers taking over enquiry- front office jobs, or alternatively now shorter time opening hours in these public used areas.

Ask any police force what their manning levels are over the weekends and nights, and I think the public would be very alarmed. But this as been the case for many years.

Regarding what the government as stated, and the electorate, then consider how many times any government of the day have done a 'U-turn' on their promises, especially when it involves things like law and order.

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john 52

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FE

If the government says there will be no cuts in frontline services, and is subsequently shown to have reneged on that promise, the electorate will have its revenge, come election day.

Well lets maybe add that promise to the election promise on spending on the NHS George Osborne has cut £766 million from the NHS in his first year and is the first real terms cut in NHS spending since the Tories were last in office in 1996/97 as waiting times are already on the increase

Election pledges and what politicians actually do are poles apart

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daz60

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"jobs being done by police officers in offices could then be done by civilian staff"

I know that there are already civilian staff working within the police "service" (they no longer appear to be a force) but given the part privatisation of the NHS could this be coded language for a similar change.!!

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morddwyd

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"Perhaps the latest drive for 'Special Constables' is the name of the game."

So are we now going to have a part-time amateur police force, just as we are moving towards a part-time amateur army, with the TA increasingly being involved in Afghanistan?

(I'm not knocking the Terriers or the Specials, both of whom provide valuable front line service)

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morddwyd

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fm

Not a point, a question, based on the point I quoted "So are we now going to have a part-time amateur police force?"

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morddwyd

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I implied nothing.

I simply asked if we were heading for a part-time amateur police force.

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