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MP comes under fire over disabled comment


john 52

Likes # 1

MP has suggested "vulnerable" jobseekers - including disabled people - should be allowed to work for less than the minimum wag

What a disgrace I am pleased David Cameron has quickly distanced himself from the comment. He should go further and and suspend him from the party until an apology is made by the MP

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wee eddie

Likes # 0

If a person can do the job, then they should be paid the going rate for that job.

The problems seem to occur when people that are able to do the job, but not without assistance, ask for parity.

Surely an Employer should get some kind of recognition for providing that assistance.

In the 25 years that I had my Café/Restaurant we employed 3 Registered Disabled People. 2 were unable to function without 1 to 1 Assistance, which was disproportionate in a department that covered a 7 day working Week with 3 Full Time Staff with a couple of Part Timers, and they moved on after a couple of months. 1 remained in our employ for many years and I still see her and her parents quite regularly. However, she only required low level assistance and was initially remunerated at a slightly lower level than her peers because of this. After 3 months, she received the same rate, as her Peers, at their request.

I don't really know how this affects the current Thread but i do know that, sometimes, integrating a Disabled Person into a Team is a stressful for all those involved.

There was a Fourth, but Customers appeared to find her presence unacceptable and she left before the first week was out at her Carer's suggestion.

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john 52

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fourm member

There is nothing to support or otherwise since he wasn't taking a position he was pointing out that disabled people had said to him they would like to be able to buy themselves into work.

"A Conservative MP has suggested" that's a bit like a newspaper wishing to add credit to a newspaper story saying a close source stated !

Are not the disabled charities the people whom he should have quoted or spoken too .

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john 52

Likes # 0

fourm member

I'm sorry but I find that a very patronising and offensive thing to say

WHY to be honest I find your attitude offensive most of the time we should be supporting disabled people to find work not telling them to ask to be paid less but that seems to be your opinion and as such you are entitled to it no matter how right wing it is

The charities are the people who represent there interests .

fourm member

**You seem to be saying that they shouldn't speak up for themselves.

I am sure you are aware depending on how and what question is asked you can get the answer you want from a person .

I suggest you watch yes Minister to see how

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Condom

Likes # 0

FE I can understand the logic of your argument but I cannot support it. The law is the law, as you are often quick to point out, so the minimum wage is indeed that and should not therefore be seen as something negotiatable. Perhaps the MP would have had more of an argument if the minimum wage wasn't so often the going rate and therefore being offered the minimum wage would not seem so bad and then could be used as part of the point I think you were trying to make as badly as I am.

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Forum Editor

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Condom

Perhaps you and others are missing the point here?

It's no good telling employers that they must pay the minimum wage to disabled people if they won't employ them. What has been suggested is that, given the choice between a disabled job candidate and an able-bodied one, employers are more likely to offer the job to the able-bodied person. If disabled people were free to say 'look, I know I can do this job, and if you give me the chance to prove I will work for slightly less than the minimum wage' they might buy themselves a slight advantage.

The argument is that this would provide disabled people with some extra leverage in the job Market, and surely that can only be a good thing.?

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natdoor

Likes # 0

Why can't they become interns? We have people who work for nothing in order to gain experience, yet people are not able to accept some level of pay below the minimum wage. This seems somewhat illogical.

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Strawballs

Likes # 0

If it is a job that a dissabled person is capable of doing as well as an able bodied person then they should get paid the same but if it is a job that their dissability stops them from doing then they can't do it so there is no reason to ever pay them less, unless you are an employer just looking for an excuse exploit the situation be it big buisness or someone employing a house servant that is a forign national.

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Joseph Kerr

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There are already ways an employer can be compensated for any extra expenses incurred by taking on a disabled person. There are also systems in place for disabled people to get work experience, though these often do not lead anywhere. It is even possible for disable people to have relatively good educations and still not find work, again for a variety of reasons.

The will to try to get a foot in the door by working for less is impressive in a way, but it does not guarantee someone progression and, for that reason, some employers may feel awkward about the idea.

Finally, to state teh obvious, unless the employee was stilll in receipt of various benefits, they would undoubtedly be worse off.

I cannot see people campaigning for this in great numbers.

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spider9

Likes # 0

"A person should always be better off if working than on benefits" - so our politicians say.

So surely a disabled person could then offer to 'work' for very little (or even no) pay and their 'benefits' would have to increase to make sure they were better off than when not 'working'?

Or am I missing something?

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Forum Editor

Likes # 0

I think we should remember that although pay is obviously important it may not be the most important factor as far as some disabled people are concerned.

The satisfaction that comes from knowing that you're working and making a contribution to society may outweigh some other considerations. I really can't see the problem with allowing disabled people the opportunity to choose to sell their labour at a price which is lower than the minimum wage.

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