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Archbishop of Canterbury has his say


Cymro.

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link text

So what do you think of this then?

Personally I think he has as much of a right to speak his mind as any of us. The Archbishop of Canterbury has warned that the government is committing Britain to "radical, long-term policies for which no-one voted".

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spider9

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I find it hard to understand the attitude that the Archbishop is 'just a priest' and so boes not have a more important view than anyone else.

"..nobody tries to pretend that he has any kind of special insight"

He holds a position which brings him into regular contact with all kinds of world leaders, both religious and political and he will be privy to many discussions that 'ordinary' people will not, due to this. Hence I think he will likely be far more informed on many matters, including government, than many of us.

And to use the 'attack' of , "he's not elected" is just nonsense - why on earth would he need to be to express a view?

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spider9

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"boes" ?? - does!

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Crosstrainer2

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Religion and politics do not make good bedfellows. Yes of course he has right to his opinion, but I think that they should be separate

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spider9

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crosstrainer2

But he wasn't expressing religious views

He was talking about govenment policies.

So why talk of 'mixing' politics and religion? Are you saying that a politician is not allowed to say what he thinks about his own religious beliefs?

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Forum Editor

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There seems to be a misunderstanding here.

The Archbishop is head of the church of England (after the Queen), and of course he meets all kinds of important people, that may mean that he's more informed than most of us on all kinds of topics, and I (for one) haven't suggested otherwise. What I suggested, and I stick to it, is that he has no special insight as far as government policies are concerned, and that his opinions on the subject carry no special weight.

If the archbishop talked about the church, or about ethics, for instance, I would certainly be interested to hear what he had to say, but government policies? No, I'm afraid he's simply expressing his personal political view, no more, no less.

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spider9

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FE

I think we mainly agree here, but I still feel he may have more 'insight' than ordinary people due to the circles he can move in, because of his position.

Otherwise, we could also say the heads of the CBI and TUC also have no greater 'insight' into 'policies'. Yet these people get quoted very regularly on political matters, because they are attempting to 'side' with their respective memberships - and that's perfectly acceptable.

Perhaps the Archbishop can be thought of as 'siding' with what he sees as his 'members' problems, and so should receive due respect for it, in the same way as the CBI and TUC do?

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Pineman100

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spider9

Individual voters did not, of course, vote for a coalition. Each one voted for the party of his or her choice.

But - as I said above - the electorate did indeed vote for a coalition. Each individual voter is a very small part of a national voice. And that voice spoke in favour of coalition by default - in other words, by not giving any one party a working majority.

You didn't vote for the coalition; I didn't vote for the coalition. The electorate did.

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john 52

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As head of the church of England he has the right to speak out if he sees an injustice being carried out . How many business leaders or politicians give there opinions on matters they know nothing about at the end of the day we are all adults and can decide for ourselves if we agree or disagree with a person opinion and if you consider he may have seen more in his life than some of the newly elected MPs who opinions you seem to think should be more valuable and carry more weight I find that strange

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john 52

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Pineman100

the electorate did indeed vote for a coalition

No No No they did not !! no party was called the coalition party so how can you vote for a party which was not on the ballet papers unless you spoiled yours and wrote the Coalition party

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Pineman100

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I refer you to my explanation above.

Whether you like it or not, this is part of our electoral system - and that of many other countries. Indeed, in some countries such coalitions are the norm.

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