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Stopping smoking.


rdave13
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There, I've started a thread about how I'm going to stop smoking... Tomorrow is Sunday and I will finnish off all the cigs I have. Monday I start night shift and a bad time as no shops will be open at 'dinner time'. Not looking foreward to failing as I've published my intent.

Anyone got pills for this problem?

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Simsy

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Some years ago my mum managed to give up. She'd smoked more than 40 a day for decades.

She did it in two stages, first she cut down to 20 a week. She was like that for about a month.

Then she gave up completely, more than 10 years ago.

She said that what made the difference was the encouragement from the doctor, when they said;

"When you are trying to give up and it's hard, and then you cave in and have one, don't think of that one cigarette and think you've failed... think of all the ones you haven't had, and realise that you're actually well on the way to succeeding"

Those words, and the fact that she did it in two stages, were the clinchers for her, after trying several times previosuly to that.

Good luck!

Regards,

Simsy

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Forum Editor

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Now cutting down to eventually stop!

That, with respect, is the problem. If you are determined to stop smoking there's only one way - stop smoking. Have a last cigarette, and throw the rest away; throw away your lighter(s), and tell everyone you know that you have stopped smoking, and ask them to help you by not offering you one.

It will be hell to start with, you'll be irritable and you won't know where to put yourself. Your body will crave nicotine, and your brain will send messages telling you to satisfy the craving - you quite literally have to fight yourself during the process. You are addicted to nicotine, and in order to beat the addiction you must suffer the withdrawal symptoms - there is no other way.

Saying that you'll cut down is simply making an excuse to carry on smoking, so don't pretend otherwise. You can do this - millions of others (including me) have done it, and you can. Do not say that you are 'trying to give up smoking', say that you have stopped, and that you will not start again. Make it as public as possible, and tell yourself that you will not smoke a cigarette today. Do the same tomorrow, and do it each morning. By the end of a fortnight or three weeks of hell you'll begin to come out of the addiction, you'll feel better physically, but you'll remember how much you enjoyed the drug. Find ways to distract yourself, and offer yourself little treats at the end of each week - a favourite food, or a good bottle of wine etc.

Pat yourself on the back at the end of each day, because you are doing a good thing; you will live longer, feel much better, and smell nicer. You'll also save money, and the house will be cleaner. There are all kinds of benefits.

I did this many years ago, but I can still remember the process.

Don't come back here telling us you've failed, and that you are ashamed. You haven't failed at all, you've just postponed your success.

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wee eddie

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I couldn't have put it better.

Great posting FE.

Your description of Withdrawal is just as I remember it. Very nasty!

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justme

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If someone expects to give up smoking at their first attempt they do not realize just how addictive smoking is.

I liken giving up smoking to learning to ride a bike. You will fall off at first but you have to just pick yourself up and try again and eventually you will succeed.

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Forum Editor

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justme

Lots of people give up at the first attempt. I was one of them, but I take no credit for it. I was highly motivated - my first daughter was about to be born, and I didn't want to be cuddling her while I reeked of cigarettes. I certainly didn't want her in a house full of cigarette smoke.

Motivation is a powerful influencing factor, and some people have less than others. Some people suffer less than others in the withdrawal stage as well, and perhaps I was one of the lucky ones - I thought I was going through hell, but maybe it was nothing compared to what others experience.

Whatever the reason, huge numbers of people do give up at the first attempt, and never go back to smoking.

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rdave13

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As from 04:00 my second attempt starts. Thank you all for your advice and encouragement. Much needed.

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Grey Goo

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rdave13

Print this up and keep it with you as an extra incentive.cough here

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Quickbeam

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Grey Goo That's sickening, and I don't smoke anyway!

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Wilham

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rdave13 I think you have a clue to the answer when you mention pills. At the next temptation to smoke replace the 'Yes' option with a ready substitute.

I failed to pack up smoking each birth of our first two children. In 1974 I had good news our third was on the way and so I got down to analysing previous failures and to devise a serious strategy.

The times I had highest stress in fact didn't cause bother because at those important meetings I wasn't able to smoke anyway. Lesser, informal events with coffee, biscuits and ashtray to hand proved breaking points.

I chose my substitute pill to be an extra srong mint, also I switched to tea from coffee where an option. At other nicotine tempting times my 'pill' could be a smallish crisp apple,... Coxes pippin, or Braeburn in season. I would chew it all, down to the nibbled stalk in my fingers. A bonus for health.

A few weeks ago, for about a pound, I bought a prepack bag containing five tubes of extra strong mints from Aldi, they appear to be normal stock. Haven't smoked since 1974, but I find when driving into traffic jams this mint is strong enough to sharpen my alertness.

Good luck. W

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Linkslade

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rdave 13

After failing many times I finally gave up smoking cigarettes after being given the following advice. Leave tea and coffee alone until the habit is conquered. Using pubs to have a drink do not sit down, if so you'll have both hands free, and also try to associate with non smokers if possible. The last tip was if you do not like cigars have a small packet with you at home and when the craving becomes acute fully inhale the cigar smoke. I did not like cigars and I think that when I did resort to them the near choking bouts they brought on finally did the trick. In about 4 weeks the worst craving was over.

I wish you all the very best of luck.

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