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Unusual Theft


superhoops

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Hi.I was a victim of a theft/fraud yesterday. I was driving home yeaterday afternoon when I had an email come through from Microsoft. " Thankyou for purchasing 1000 xbox points etc etc." Thought this was odd but thought that maybe my youngest son, who lives with his mother and has an xbox there as well, was being a cheeky git and using my xbox account to buy points for the xbox there. I phoned my credit card automated line to hear that this had resulted in a £8.50 charge.

Approx ten minutes later another email came through "thanks for purchasing 5000 xbox points etc". I texted my sons mother and asked her to ask him if he was doing this - I doubted it by now as 5000 points is £42.50 and he wouldnt dare! She replied he hadnt. I immediately rang the credit card and got the card cancelled. They will be sending me a declaration form which, hopefully, should result in getting the money back.

I know this is a small fry as far as crime is concerned but what I find hard to understand is 1) Surely the thieves can be traced by whom the points were credited and 2) How did they hack into my xbox?

It has taught me to never have credit card details saved on the xbox etc again. I hope I get the £51 back but of course Microsoft may say that I must have given the password to someone, which of course I havent.

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OTT_B

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"1) Surely the thieves can be traced by whom the points were credited"

Yes, they can be, but they probably won't be. £51 just isn't worth the effort for either the banks or police (and any insurance companies involved, who may be tied in with the bank), especially where there is probably a "cross border" crime. I.e. the person with your details could well be sat in his / her living room in the US.

Sorry to hear about it though. Most banks are pretty quick to refund money in these cases, especially if you've queried it straight away.

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daz60

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I have to agree with OTT_B,my case recently was an "hole in the wall" scam. In putted my details and the machine locked up without releasing my card.This at 6 in the morning,thought the machine had packed up, went home and called at the bank to say what happened,2 days before my holiday. £3oo pound removed no card for holiday. The bank was extremely helpful,money refunded,the Police sent letter on return,we do not feel we can continue with this investigation. Yes FE,it is the banks money they steal not yours,but it is the principle that matters,a concept thieves know nothing about, until you steal from them.

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superhoops

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Daz60 Must have been a nightmare just before your holiday, glad you got the money back quick. Hope I get mine as quick, also hope I get a new card pretty soon

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spuds

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At least the Nat West seem to offer a solution to the 'lost cards' problem if their adverts are anything to go on.

But regarding fraud, I seem to have read recently that banks are trying to make it far more difficult for the customer, if fraud is suspected.

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Forum Editor

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"....banks are trying to make it far more difficult for the customer, if fraud is suspected."

They can try as much as they like, but provided the customer hasn't done anything to prejudice the security of his/her card details they will have no option but to make a credit back to the card account.

Storing your card details on a computer is not a very sensible practice, and might give your card provider an excuse to contest a claim. Storing your card details with a third-party online retailer - like Amazon, for instance - is common practice

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spuds

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Might be worth a read, especially the readers views?. link text

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daz60

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spuds, your link...basically in a nutshell,exactly what i was told by the police. In order for the banks investigation (?) to proceed they needed a crime reference which was provided.A catch22 situation.

Here is something i fear may be too common,i did not have protection on my debit card (don't use credit cards) because i imagined it was only for CC's. Needless to say that was rectified immediately.

The GOV have literally given carte-blanche to the criminal fraternity and police resources already under stress are being channelled elsewhere. Superhoops,yes that was a relief, the Nationwide acted promptly and were extremely helpful so the holiday went better than expected.

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