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Tech Helproom


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WiFi Through Thick Stone Walls


ClareGardiner

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We have BT broadband with a router in the larder at the back of the house where the telephone cable comes in. Our new laptop gets wifi in the house without any problem, but we have a shop only a few feet from the room where the laptop works, but there is a thick stone gable end with and inglenook between the two. The windows in the larder and the extension face in the same direction. Does anyone know how we can get the wifi to work in the shop?

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SillBill

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You may have to play about with the location of the plugs (repeaters)

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Secret-Squirrel

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Clare, I really don't see how a WiFi repeater will get the signal through your thick stone walls.

Nontek's suggestion is probably the best one as it'll use your mains wiring to get the Internet into your shop. However, because you've got a laptop, you may want to use it wirelessly so a pair of these may be more suitable. You simply plug one into the mains socket near your router then attach the router to it with the supplied network cable. In the shop you plug in the wireless unit into any available mains socket and a new wireless network will be available for your laptop with no unsightly cables to be seen anywhere.

One word of warning caution though - powerline adapters don't always work reliably when they're plugged into those electrical power-strips with multiple sockets. It's always best to plug each unit into its own socket on the wall.

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SillBill

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That's why I asked if the shop is on the same electrical (mains) circuit as the house.

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Nontek

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Will a home-plug in the house and the shop do the trick? ..... Yes!

Also very easy to set-up, just Plug and Play. One plug goes into a mains socket near the Router and is connected to Router via ethernet cable (which is provided, for each plug bought), and then another plug can be inserted in any Mains socket anywhere on the same ring-main, which in turn is connected to laptop via supplied ethernet cable.

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bumpkin

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I have tried some of the plug in mains devices, never found them much good If it is important why not use a cable it has to be the most reliable connection.

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ClareGardiner

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Thank you everyone for your kind assistance, it is much appreciated.

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Secret-Squirrel

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"I have tried some of the plug in mains devices, never found them much good"

You've been very unlucky Ray as it's robust, reliable technology that does work. Were you perhaps using yours in those multi-socket power-strips that I warned about in my previous post?

Anyhow, Amazon is a reputable retailer, and with the UK distance selling regulations, Clare would probably get a refund if they don't work for her.

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onthelimit1

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'BT telephone line is split by the engineer who installed it into a telephone line and a broadband line at its entry point to the house'

Not strictly true. Normally the phone line terminates in a master socket into which a filter is plugged. It is this filter that splits the broadband (ADSL) and voice. Some master socket faceplates have a built-in filter and a twin socket faceplate - one for phone and one for broadband. You cannot plug a second router into a phone extension - only one router per phone line.

So, Homeplugs are the best way to go.

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SillBill

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onthelimit1 - of course your explanation is technically correct, I tried to keep my description as simple as possible. It is more than likely that if a BT engineer installed Clare's phone and Broadband then he installed a twin main socket, effectively "splitting" the connection. However you can EXTEND the ADSL socket using proper cabling and accepting a subsequent slight falling off of the signal.

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onthelimit1

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'However you can EXTEND the ADSL socket using proper cabling'

I understand what you mean, now. It is also possible, of course, to run an ethernet cable from a spare port on the router to elsewhere. However, as she wants to avoid cabling, the Homeplugs are probably the simplest option.

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