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How to program a pushbutton?


stlucia2
Resolved

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I posted this on the general forum, but no response. I've now realised theres a dedicated web design forum, so I'm posting here now:-

For many years now I have created and maintained a web site for a club I'm a member of. It is hand-coded in HTML, and contains a dozen or so pages with text and graphics; and the links between pages are simple text using the "A HREF= ..." command.

I'm trying to smarten up the site by using pushbuttons, and have been reading up on the "BUTTON" command. I've got one code that works as follows:-

(form) (input type="button" value="Click here to enter" onclick="window.location.href='contents.htm'") (/form)

... and another one that doesn't:-

(button type="button" value="Click here to enter" onclick="window.location.href='contents.htm'") (/button)

in each case using angle brackets where the curved ones are.

The first example works fine; the second one only creates a very small button with no text in it, but it does go to the correct page when clicked. So, any idea what's wrong with its code, please?

Also, I thought that defining the style and colour of the text on the button would be a simple matter of inserting ** (or whatever) into the code, but it doesn't seem to do anything. So can someone help me on that, please?

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LastChip

Likes # 0

Wow! You're really putting me on the spot and likely to start wars!

Here's my view for what it's worth.

IE is a web developers worst nightmare. There's just too much that doesn't work and too many standards that Microsoft have totally ignored in a futile attempt to lock the browser market.

Firefox was for many years my browser of choice. I still use it as my primary development browser, simply because there are such good plug-ins to help the process and make my life easier. It was once a lean, fast browser for which we all have a great debt to pay. As it was primarily Firefox that caused Microsoft to to grudgingly start to redevelop IE, as it had fallen way behind (and still is). Sadly, Firefox has ended up almost as bloated as IE and personally, I think it's lost its edge.

Chrome is undoubtedly fast and generally good, but does have some strange behaviours on occasions. It can be particularly cantankerous when trying to run javascript on a development site (on a local machine).

Undoubtedly, Opera is the most underrated browser at present and I love it. It's stable, pretty much standards compliant and is generally the first browser I use to test a new site after initial development in Firefox (for the reasons I've given). If a site works well in Opera, then generally it's OK in Firefox, Chrome and Safari. So you only end up rebuilding it for IE!

Safari renders nicely, but is slow. Though I have to say, I don't have an up-to-date version, so it may have improved.

The problem is, in spite of EU declarations, many people still only know IE as the thing you get on the Internet with. It's different here, because you're talking to (at the very least) people who have a strong interest in computers and who are on the whole knowledgeable. The average computer user, isn't.

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stlucia2

Likes # 0

OK, I'll try to forestall any war by ticking this question "closed" ;-)

But thanks for your views. So long as IE's still working (and for me it does access some features of some sites that FF didn't), I'll stick with it as my main browser. But I think I'll have a look at Opera.

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