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Tech Helproom


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Faulty laptop to be returned. Can I safely erase information, and transfer MS Office to new laptop?


nucom

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I have had the laptop 7 months, and it is unlikely the supplier will be able to repair or replace it.

It came with MS starter programme installed, but I installed Office Professional (2 user only) and other software, and would prefer not to have to repurchase the software, particularly Office, again.

Any information or help would be very much appreciated.

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markd71

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I'd disregard the e-mail and Install the Office on your new machine as you will still be in compliance of the licence as long as it is removed from the broken laptop.

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lotvic

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"I received an email from the supplier of the MS Office software" and "The Office software was bought from a Student Provider at a reduced rate. It does have discs and a product key"

Tell us who this Student Provider is.

This version of Office did not come with the laptop. If it came with discs and a product key I really can't see the problem in transferring the licence to another pc. The licence is from Microsoft not the supplier you bought it off. The only problem may be with activation of a one licence edition which means you have to phone MS so they can cancel the previous pc details they collected upon activation for that product key that it was (and now is no longer) installed on.

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Woolwell

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Wrongly sold OEM software? Otherwise you should be able to transfer it.

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Sea Urchin

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You say in your original question that the Office Professional is for two users - so no problem anyway that I can see using it on a second machine. And as lotvic says above the licence is with Microsoft and not the supplier.

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nucom

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Thanks again for the new responses.

To clarify a little further, the Student Provider is a well-known Supplier, that is widely recommended on various forums, including this site.

I ordered and paid for the software on behalf of my grandson and his details were forwarded as required.

The software is marked “LICENSED FOR USE BY STUDENTS AND FACULTY . ILLEGAL TO RESELL OR MAKE COPIES OF THIS DISK” It also states “Not for retail or OEM Distribution. Not for resale”. I don’t know whether this would be regarded as “wrongly sold OEM software” but I suspect not.

My understanding was that the software could be installed on a computer and a portable device – laptop. This appeared to be an ideal solution for our situation, as my grandson could comfortably work on his school/home work on the desktop, plus he would also have the possibility of continuing elsewhere on the laptop, as and when needed. Either way my granddaughter and I would still have access to a computer to pursue our computing, homework and hobby requirements.

I contacted Microsoft about the problem being experienced and the need to uninstall Office from the faulty laptop and to install it on a replacement laptop. They told me I would have to contact the Software Supplier, which I did. The Supplier states that I cannot do this due to a restriction imposed by Microsoft, not them, but I can’t help wondering why Microsoft did not tell me this when I contacted them.

I asked the supplier why they did not make this huge potential problem clear on their website and they responded that they did, under “System Requirements” - “*Please note that changing hardware may result in a loss of license. Licenses are non-transferrable”.

I would add that it took me quite a while to locate this on their website, but it does state this under the information provided under the heading 'System Requirements' for their current, AND MUCH MORE EXPENSIVE, version of Microsoft Office 2010 Professional Plus.

The banner headline for this product also states it is a “FULL VERSION, DISCOUNT PRICE, LIFETIME USE.”

I explained to them that as the owner of fairly high spec computers, one of which being a 7 month oId laptop, I had no reason to doubt they would not meet system requirements for software, consequently I did not look at this section. But, even if I had, I would not have fully understood the implications, particularly as the statement includes the word MAY - “…changing hardware may result in a loss of license”.

I interpret hardware to mean things you put in or take out of a computer, not a whole computer, and I would also have interpreted the restriction on transferring licences to mean the license could not be transferred to another person.

I therefore suggested that placing such an important statement only under the section 'System Requirements', may be viewed as unjust and discriminating against those who do not have any doubts about their computer’s ability to cope with the Office software.

I also asked them to let me know under what circumstances a licence would not be lost if hardware is changed.

Unfortunately my comment and question have been ignored.

Instead, in their latest response they state I may be glad to hear that I may reinstall the software on the same hardware several times provided no key hardware changes are made – which frankly just rubs salt into the wound! But, then I realise I don’t really know what this means either, and none of this helps my grandson.

They also advise that they will review the wording and location of their message on future product pages in a view to further highlight this potential loss in cases of hardware failure, so I have advised them that I just hope their new message is placed in a prominent position that cannot be missed.

In view of a further message (see below) which was included in one of their responses, and also in a recent sales email, both of which warned about the impending cessation of their previous method of selling ‘Office’ and urged recipients to buy quickly:-

Pimp My PC! ** Kit out those new X'mas laptops & PC's with Microsoft Office Pro Plus 2010 for only £37.89…” “…Help us spread the word this New Year! We promise to continue to come up with best money saving offers and fun promotions for 2012 so if you’re a parent, tell your kids. If you’re a teacher, tell your students. If you’re a social media wizard, make a load of noise on twitter or like us on facebook...every little helps!”**

I have therefore also suggested that their future email fliers could also contain the amended message, and that it might also help if they spread their amended cautionary message onTwitter and Facebook!

Unfortunately I am not a member of either of these social networks, but my grandchildren are, and it is my grandson who is affected by this problem.

More objectively though, in spite of the Software Supplier’s claims about the supposed availability of a 'perpetual licence' or promise of ‘lifetime use’, it would appear the terms ‘perpetual’ and ‘lifetime’ refer to the longevity of the ‘hardware’, not the student, which begs the question how many students are likely to have the same computer for the next 50, 40, 30, 20, 10, 5 years, or even 1 year or less?

If you have reached the end of this ‘rant’ I thank you, but I would also suggest that if you, or anyone you know, is tempted to buy such software from any Student Provider, it might be worth contacting them beforehand to check out the Provider's policies on such matters.

For now I will try following the advice that some have offered, and I will contact Microsoft to enquire what, if anything, they are prepared to do about the potential incongruities that can arise when their offer to support students is taken up.

I also think it would be useful for me to contact Consumer Rights about the seemingly misleading selling I have experienced. It maybe that my grandson is the only one to lose out to date, but the potential remains for many more to end up in the same situation.

Thank you again to all those who have offered help and advice.

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lotvic

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From what you say I surmise it's software4students I think you should just ignore the confused information you have got from them and just follow the normal route of install Office on new laptop from the disk.

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finerty

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likely that they will send you a new laptop same make and model unless they try to reset it themselves but they probably test it before returning.

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