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Upgrading Wireless Card


D@z©

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Hi I have a Dell Vostro 3700 which I believe has a built in 802.11g card. Can I upgrade it to a 802.11n which will get the most of my fibre optic BB? If so could you provide links on what would be a suitable purchase. Thanks.

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northumbria61

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but most only have a 150mbps transfer rate which is what I am getting now anyway

Not quite correct - in the Link I sent you earlier Broadbandbuyer.co.uk there are at least 40 @ 300mbps - 3 @ 450mbps and 1 at 900mbps.

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D@z©

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A lot of cards I see are described as 802.11g/b/n which is what mine is. What does it mean when they have all 3 letters then? If I specifically want the 'N' which is the fastest transfer rate?

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northumbria61

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Wi-Fi capability - The BGN refers to the three 802.11 technologies that are commonly supported in laptops and wireless routers (802.11b, 802.11g, 802.11n)

ABG it means that it is compatible with A, B and G protocols. A it's not used a lot, B it's 11 Mbps, G it's 54 Mbps. BG it's compatible with BG. ABGN, N is currently the fastest of all.

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northumbria61

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And if you have got a few hours to spare read this enter link description here - and here enter link description here

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D@z©

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Thanks northumbria61, what I mean is a lot of the cards I see for sale are called 802.11b/g/n and not 802.11b or 802.11g or 802.11n with just the single letter after so how do I know I will be pruchasing specifically an 'n'?

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northumbria61

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It means that your wireless card will work with all 3 and backwards compatible. (In simple terms if you have an N Router it will work with B/G/N as it is backwards compatible - but if your Router is G then you won't get N speed.

If you have an N Router you can use G devices but you will not be able to avail yourself of features specific to the N standard

Wireless G is usually half the price, but that's okay due to the fact most people don't "need" Wireless-N, that is to say that they don't benefit due mostly to the fact that while N does increase data-rate-transmission, this is generally only useful for networking (transferring files from one computer to another in a home/office network ie. laptop-desktop).

N does increase range, and this is important for trying to receive a signal through a floor lets say, but as for speed, if you don't subscribe to a fast, most likely expensive internet service (greater than high-speed) you wont even notice the difference, trust me. So what I'm trying to say is, go with Wireless-G if you're not networking, and money is an issue, if not, go with N

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northumbria61

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what I mean is a lot of the cards I see for sale are called 802.11b/g/n

That is the standard nowadays so that the card will work with most Routers.

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