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Wireless or Ethernet Connection


wee eddie

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I have just upgraded my Internet Connection to a 20Mb/s one. BT told me that my line should support between 7Mb/s and 11Mb/s but I am only managing 3.45Mb/s.

Currently, my PC has no Wireless Card, so it is connected to the "Home Hub" by a CAT5 Cable. The Home Hub is connected to an Extension Telephone Socket, about 20' from the Main Socket.

My Question: Would I be better off to stick a Wireless Card, or Dongle, into the PC and connect the Home Hub to the main Telephone Socket?

My Lappy has a neat little Wireless Dongle which works well through two walls. If I were to add a Powered USB Hub, to the PC, and plug the Dongle into that. Would it be OK.

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difarn

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This is from the BT website and is in according with the BT Engineer I spoke to:-

"t's vitally important to make sure there's a broadband filter plugged into every active telephone socket in your house, including sockets used by Sky boxes. Active sockets are ones with a telephone or other device such as a fax plugged in. You don't need to bother with sockets that aren't being used for anything.

You don't need microfilters if your master socket has a broadband faceplate. A broadband faceplate has two sockets - one for your phone line, and another for your broadband.

You also don't need microfilters if you've got fibre-based broadband, like BT Infinity. You'll know you've got fibre-based broadband if your broadband setup looks like this, with your BT Home Hub plugged into an Openreach modem using an Ethernet cable."

So if you are right in saying you don't need one if the master socket has a broadband faceplate, with two sockets - these are usually fitted by BT if you have their broadband - many people do not have BT and do not have this faceplate fitted and this is why internal filters are recommended by ISP's.

So if you do not have one of these fitted - use a microfilter is the advice - certainly worked for me.

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spuds

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"-many people do not have BT"

Correct me if I am wrong, but ISP's who use landlines and charge rental for using same, which is in the majority, use a BT provided service. Hull perhaps being the exception.

BT OpenReach will do all exterior repairs, including the main socket inside a property or premises, if you use any independent ISP. Interior work will depend on terms and conditions of provider. ISP's may use their own engineers inside customers premises, depending again on agreements or requirements.

Cable or satellite reception or provision is a different issue and matter.

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difarn

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The comment about many people do not have BT was meant to say that they are fixing up their Routers via the BT phone socket already installed in their home, many of which do not have the broadband faceplate mentioned above but just a single socket. As you say BT would probably come and change this, at a cost.

So the advice from BT and ISP's is if you do not have one of the two socket faceplates fitted then use a microfilter.

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