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Tech Helproom


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Homeplugs


bremner

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A friend has purchased a wireless Homeplug kit as his house has thick walls and his router signal is unusable in his lounge.

We have plugged the first unit into the study and connected this by ethernet to his router a few feet away. Plugging the wireless plug in the study we set it up using the supplied software and both his Windows laptop and my iPad connect wireless perfectly well. Full wireless signal and no problem connecting to the Internet.

Moved the wireless plug to the lounge great wireless signal on the computers but no Internet connection. Tried it in the hall and kitchen where it connects perfectly to the Internet then upstairs where again no Internet.

Checking his electrics showed that the study and hall are on one ring main, the kitchen on another, the lounge and upstairs on two others. All are on the same side of a consumer unit protected by an RCD.

Has anyone got any idea why it works across two ring mains but not the other two.

Thanks

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bremner

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.

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octal

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I think I've got to grips with what you are saying, it is working on one ring main, but when you plug it in the other sockets on another ring main it doesn't work. I think that is part of the problem, although they say they should work though circuit breakers I've got my doubts because it might depend on the type of circuit breaker. If they are thermal type they might work, but if they are magnetic type then you might have a problem, these HomePlugs are radio frequency devices and if you start putting coils in the circuit like magnetic breakers then you are effectively blocking the RF from getting though.

The other thing to look out for are switch mode power supplies, the type that charge mobile phones, they seemed to be used on everything these days, they can cause interference, as I said before these Home Plugs are RF devices so the receiver in them will pick up interference on the circuit as well as the intended signal.

The length of the cable will also have an affect, the longer the cable the greater the loss will be, so it might be just too far to receive a signal on the most distant device at the end of a circuit.

As you are finding out, it's flaky technology at best with so many variables. It might be better to look at the WiFi again and see if you can boost the signal, or use a repeater somehow.

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octal

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I just want to add, you might get a good signal strength, that doesn't mean that the signal quality is good, this does point to something that is corrupting the data signal, like a circuit breaker, if the receiver is picking up a good signal but the data is corrupted then it can't decode it.

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bremner

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Octal

Thanks for the response.

I am going to have a look at the MCB's as i recall there were different types.

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