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? How to - Create Image backup on Ext Drive, pls


AroundAgain

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Hi

I have, very recently, bought myself an External Drive, for backup. I'm able to copy files/docs across but I haven't a clue as to how to create an image backup of OS and installed programs etc.

Having just read the post re (Teamviewer) scams, I realise I'm now in a position to have this backup, and how vital it is!

So, please, in 'simple' language, could you explain.

I'm using Win XP but have Vista on my laptop - would like to do both machines.

Thanks very much

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AroundAgain

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Hi

This is all very interesting but I'm getting confused. Maybe if I clarify what I would like to achieve...

In the unfortunate event of having serious problems, rather than reinstall OS and download all the various programs I use, I would like to have my machine 'back to normal' as easily as possible. My personal data would be separate, and I could access/copy as required.

I'm now confused as to whether I need an image, clone or recovery disc.

My understanding is, now, that a recovery disc will put the OS back but not the downloaded programs; an image compacts the whole lot, including personal data files, and compresses, takes more consideration to put back to the HDD; a clone is a copy of the system as of when it was copied, and is bootable - but can I assume a clone can be copied back to the HDD in order to restore how it was?

Sorry if this seems muddled - indicates my confusion !!! ;)

Thanks

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robinofloxley

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New ext drive means Imaging is what you want.

Install Macrium, Easeus, Paragon or ATI on computer or laptop.

Make/Create an image, select which partitions you want in the image. Ext drive is the destination.

Repeat for the other computer/laptop.

It's a good idea to put them in separate folders.

eg X:\LAPTOPNAME OR X:\COMPUTERNAME where X: is you ext drive letter.

Make a boot CD/DVD from whichever program you installed.

If your personal data was in one of the partitions it will be included. If not make a separate backup.

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Nontek

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A full Backup using Acronis will restore the hard drive to exactly as it was at the time the backup was created. I mean EXACTLY. What can be clearer than that?

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stlucia2

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OK, it's becoming clearer for me, I think: If I Restore an Acronis Backup of a complete C:\ drive, I'll get back what I had when I made the backup, and it'll run just like it did at that time. But if I try to Restore a single program that's gone bad, it possibly won't run because the registry won't be correct. Is that right?

That being the case, my big confusion is, what is the purpose of a Clone when a complete-drive Backup can restore the drive to what it was before?

Sorry for interrupting your thread AroundAgain, but I hope this debate is helping :-)

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AroundAgain

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Hi

stlucia2 - Yes. Thanks for your input. I'm very relieved someone else is still unclear as to what is what. It makes me feel a bit less stupid, in spite of me having an IT degree!!! No-one can know everything about computers, tech stuff, etc. I know what I know, but not this stuff.

So, stlucia, please keep asking - your questions are very helpful to me, along with the responses of course.

Nontek - Thanks. I'm sure you have tried to be helpful but, what presumably seems easy to you, isn't easy to everyone else. It's NOT easy to sift through all this when it is a NEW CONCEPT. So, please try not to sound so condescending.

The options of 'backup', 'full backup', 'clone', 'image', 'rescue', 'recovery' seem to mean one thing to one person and something different to someone else.

Also, whatever does 'mount' do (in the techie sense, of course!)?

robinofloxley - thanks for your response, which has made a few things clearer, and that's much appreciated.

So, as you can see, there are still some questions unanswered. Apologies to those who consider this stuff to be basic knowledge.

Thanks

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AroundAgain

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Sorry, forgot to add ...

Do I need to partition my existing HDD before doing any of the above? Currently, there is no partition. I wouldn't know where to start with that, either!

Thanks for your help

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rdave13

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Think of imaging your hard drive as taking a photo and putting it in a capsule either on a different partition on the C: drive or on another drive. This can be 'incremental' and any changes updates just those changes. To return the C: drive from an image the program you use has already made you burn a bootable disc to return your drive to a certain image.

Cloning is similar but it only takes a single 'photo' of the drive 'as is' and transfers this 'photo' to another drive and will usually clone all partitions to the same percentages of size. You then can physically swap the drives an it will be exactly as the old drive had been.

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robinofloxley

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AroundAgain

When you mount an image, drive letter(s) are given to the partition(s) in the image. eg if you made an image of c: and d: and mounted it, you would be asked to confirm a couple of letters. If you chose X: and Y:. you can then browse (and copy) any files/folders in Explorer. This saves having to restore a full image if you don't want to.

Existing HDD partitions - Do you mean main drive or new ext drive? Right click My Computer. Select manage/Disk Management to see what you have.

-x-x-x-

St Lucia - Clones are usually when you replace your HDD.

You don't need to save an Image anywhere (you positively may not want to).

Say you wanted to upgrade a 160GB internal HDD with a new blank internal 500GB. You could image to an external drive and then restore the image to the new drive.

But cloning is easier to go directly from old to new. Also,clone software can automatically resize your partitions to fill the extra space.

Then you set your system to boot from the new internal drive (possibly swapping cables over, setting it as Master) The old drive can then be used for whatever.

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rdave13

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To try to be clearer, cloning is a once operation by moving all info to another drive. Once done then that is it. You've cloned the drive. So you will have another hard drive complete with the OS and all programs still installed and running with everything else you had on the older HDD. Imaging is ongoing and will update the image as you work, hopefully, so when you restore from an image (capsule) it will be up to date.

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AroundAgain

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Thanks, rdave13 Thats a good description and has confirmed what I was just grasping. Can I assume the incremental bit includes any further programs downloaded or updated? Or do you mean documents and stuff only etc?

Need to suss out the partitioning bit, re the existing drive, then hopefully can get down to it.

Thanks very much

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