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IP network two TP-Link router problem.


matjoss

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Hi, Im not that up on networking but here is what I have done at a friends house.

She lives in a big house so what I have done is used a tp-ling adsl router (router 1)at one end of the house with a ip address 192.168.1.1 a cat 5 cable runs to the other end of the house with a TP-Link wireless router (router 2) at the other end of which I have changed the ip address to 192.168.2.1 as it was conflicting with the first router (they had the same ip).

So I connected one laptop to the router 2 and it connected to the internet no problem. I did an ipconfig and its gateway was 192.168.1.1 (router 1). I connected a second laptop and straight away it connected to the internet and had the same gateway ip.

I try to connect a brand new laptop and it wont connect. It can only see router 2 (192.168.2.1) I have ping'ed 192.168.1.1 but its not accessable. I have gone into the dhcp and changed the default gateway to 192.168.1.1 on the laptop but still won't work. It must be a setting on the new laptop that needs changing. Its on W7 home.

Anyone know what can be wrong? Why 2 laptops where fine but the third not?

Sorry for the long post.

Cheers Matt.

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mgmcc

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You don't say what type of router the second one is. If it's a Cable/DSL router (i.e without a built-in ADSL Modem), then its WAN port should be connected to the main router. Its WAN IP address, which would normally be an internet IP address, will in this situation be a 192.168.1.x address allocated by the first router. It will in turn allocate 192.168.2.x addresses to any computers connected to it.

The problem arises if you should want to network computers connected to the different routers, and thus different Subnets (IP address ranges), because they won't see each other. The Subnet Mask, as its name suggests, "masks" the separate Subnets to keep them separate.

"I try to connect a brand new laptop and it wont connect. It can only see router 2 (192.168.2.1) I have ping'ed 192.168.1.1 but its not accessable. I have gone into the dhcp and changed the default gateway to 192.168.1.1 on the laptop but still won't work"

If it is connected to router2 with a 192.168.2.x IP address, then its Default Gateway address is 192.168.2.1 and router2 itself will have a WAN Default Gateway address of 192.168.1.1 which is router1. The computer with a 192.168.2.x address will not be able to ping 192.168.1.1

The alternative arrangement would be to disable router2's DHCP server and connect it via one of its LAN ports to router1. It would then perform as a basic Network Switch / Wireless Access Point with all addresses allocated by router1 and in the 192.168.1.0 subnet.

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matjoss

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Hi mgmcc, thanks for the reply.

The second router is a cable router and I have it connected via one of its lan not the wan port. I did turn off dhcp on the second router but I have reset it since and thought it turned itself back on again.

The 2 laptops that work have a default gateway of 192.168.1.1 so it sounds like these are set up as your alternative arrangement. I just searched for available networks and clicked the second routers ssid. This worked fine with 2 laptops. But the new laptop is having none of it.

Is there a setting on the new laptop that I can change?

Thanks again for the reply.

P.S. do you know of any good websites that explain piggybacking routers and there ip configurations. I have googled it but come up with nothing usefull.

Cheers Matt

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mgmcc

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"do you know of any good websites that explain piggybacking routers and their ip configurations. I have googled it but come up with nothing useful"

I have basically told you how to piggyback routers:

1) To use a Cable/DSL Router as a "sub-router", you connect its RJ45 ethernet WAN port to one of the main router's LAN ports. It then continues to function as a router, i.e. "routes" network traffic to the appropriate IP address within the Local Area Network. It will have to allocate addresses in a different subnet (IP address range) from the main router.

2) With either a Cable/DSL router or an ADSL Modem/Router, connect one of its LAN ports to one of the main router's LAN ports and disable the second router's DHCP server. It will then function as a Network Switch / Wireless Access Point for the main router, but it won't itself function as a router.

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matjoss

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Hi mgmcc

I really appreciate your reply and please don't take this the wrong way as I probebly did not explain myself very well.

I am thinking I have the routers set up as you described in your alternative description, so the piggybacking is not the issue. The issue is why have two laptops connected ok but the third one does not.

My question is (if I have the routers set up ok) why does the new laptop not see the 192.168.1.1 gateway as the other two do. I have done nothing different with the laptops.

So what I need to know is there a ip setting I should be changing on the new laptop or any other settings.

Thanks again for any advice you can give me.

Cheers Matt

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mgmcc

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If you have configured the second router so that its DHCP server is disabled, you will be connecting to it either by ethernet cable or wirelessly, but all addresses will continue to be allocated by the main router. There will only be one Default Gateway in the network which is the IP address of the main router. What you should have are two separate SSID names, which is how you select which Wireless Access Point to connect to - Router1 or Router2.

"The issue is why have two laptops connected ok but the third one does not."

Which router, identified by its SSID, have the two Laptops connected to and which router are you trying to connect the third Laptop to?

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matjoss

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The second (cable router 192.168.2.1) router's ssid is 'office' the first (adsl 192.168.1.1) router is 'tp-link'.

All the laptops are connected to 'office' (second router) the signal is too week to connect to 'tp-link' (big farm house with thick walls).

If you do cmd 'ipconfig /all' on them all the two that get the internet have a default gateway of 192.168.1.1 the one that can not see the internet has a default gateway of 192.168.2.1.

Of course if I take any one of them to within range of the 'tp-link' adsl router and connect to that they all get internet access.

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mgmcc

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"the one that can not see the internet has a default gateway of 192.168.2.1"

Have you configured this Laptop manually with its IP, Subnet Mask and Default Gateway addresses? If the second router's DHCP server has been disabled, there is no way that the Laptop should be getting this Default Gateway address automatically.

Can you post its IPCONFIG /ALL details into a reply here?

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matjoss

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Hi mgmcc

sorry its been a while, I finaly went round to have another go at it and she said its been working fine. So some how its connected itself.

Thanks for your help.

Cheers Matt

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