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"Relevant Knowledge" Virus, - is it real?


thegreypanther

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I have received a warning, courtesy Microsoft, that the W32/Chir.B@mm virus, - contained in the file rlvknlg.exe, is somewhere on my PC. I have run the MS Security Scanner and it found no problem. My PC is protected by Norton's System Security, and that has found no problem. Is "Relevant Knowledge" a real threat, and if so where has it come from and how do I get rid of it?

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johndrew

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The W32/Chir.B@mm virus is a threat.

The Relevant Knowledge Virus is also real. Removal instructions are contained in the thread.

All malware needs your protection to be fully up to date to be recognised and removed.

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thegreypanther

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Many thanks, johndrew. I had noticed one of these surveys popping up on my PC, but had simply deleted it. Obviously, that was Relevant Knowledge at work. I used SpyHunter to remove this problem. SpyHunter has sorted out a number of other problems as well, but at $49.99 for a 6 month subscription I am afraid that the cost is a bit on the high side. I shall now have to look around for less expensive, but equally effective, anti-spyware programs.

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johndrew

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Try Malwarebytes or Spyware Terminator or you can run both with no problem. To block spyware you could run SpywareBlaster again this will run in the background without conflict with the preceding software.

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thegreypanther

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Many thanks, johndrew.

I will have a look at all of the programs you have suggested.

I will be fascinated if anybody reading these posts has any idea as to where Relevant Knowledge came from. My PC recently suffered a failure of the mother board and I have had to reload masses of software back onto the system. Would Relevant Knowledge have come from one of these programs, - or Skype, or DropBox? Ore some ill-advised browsing?

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johndrew

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Look at the last entry as the origin appears to be the Netherlands. However, once released into the wild any virus could be picked up from any number of sources; as you say ".. Skype, or DropBox? Ore some ill-advised browsing?". Depending upon the other software you loaded and its source (CD excluded) it may also be picked up from there.

If you don't use a site security advisor (WOT or McAfee Siteadvisor for example) it is unlikely you would know that a site was suspect.

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Simsy

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I'm interested in the first phrase of the original post; "I have received a warning, courtesy Microsoft", specifically the "courtesy Microsoft" part.

How did Microsoft inform you? Usually an email purporting to be from Microsoft is some kind of scam?

Regards,

Simsy

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thegreypanther

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Simsy

The MS warning came up as a text box, though I can't remember the exact details. The text box said to use the MS Security Centre on the PC, - there were no links so that there was no chance of connecting to some scam or other.

But then, having been given the warning by Microsoft their recommended ways of clearing the problem didn't work!

My own feeling is that I would have picked up Relevant Knowledge while re-installing software, as much of the software is easily obtained as a web download. e.g. Acronis True Image, Photodex ProShow Gold, etc. All well-known and reputable programs, but somewhere or other Relevant Knowledge crept in.

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