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A Scam phone call accepted


swapper

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My friends who are very new to the PC World have been taken in by a phone call.

A person telephoned them at home saying that the caller represented "Microsoft PC Solutions" that my friends had a serious problem with their PC and it had come to light at Microsoft. To cut a long story short, they switched on their PC and allowed access to the caller, who took charge of their PC (Vista Home). My friend became a little concerned and called a stop to it because he was out of his depth, and did not understand what was going on.

I suggesed to him that he did not use the PC online anymore until every password on it has been changed.

There were no banking details on it, and very little information apart from emails, photographs and some on line shopping carried out by his wife who is also an administrator, using her own entry password. etc. Advice please, apart from learning a lesson, what risks have they encountered, what damage can continue even if they change every password?

Thanks a lot.

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Woolwell

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Change e-mail passwords with ISP etc and the on-line shopping password.

Monitor credit card accounts but hopefully they will be safe.

Otherwise I think that they have done everything possible.

Lesson learnt.

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robinofloxley

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They could have done anything as if they were at the computer. Worst case would be a keylogger so any changes to passwords would still be 'eavesdropped'. And any online purchases/payments disclosed.

However I have not heard of any cases of that.

Restore the computer to before the phone call if possible. Run Malwarebytes scan. Run a full Anti-virus scan. Also a SuperantiSpyware scan for belt and braces.

link text

link text

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swapper

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Thank you both for the input,I will pass this along, and I know they are telling everyone about this, so in a way more people will be made aware.

thanks again

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swapper

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just a thought, my friend has Microsoft security essentials and Malwarebytes.

Is SuperantiSpyware as good as/better, or in addition to the above.

Thanks

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lotvic

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SuperantiSpyware in addition to the others. Three things to protect against, Viruses, Malware and Spyware.

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spuds

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Microsoft are aware of these scams, as are a number of other forums. If your friend as the details of the company who are suggesting that Microsoft are involved, then report the matter to Microsoft for their records.

As already been suggested, get your friend to run all the necessary security and protection programs, they don't want any possible nasties to appear at a later time.

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proudfoot

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robinofloxly posted:-

They could have done anything as if they were at the computer. Worst case would be a keylogger so any changes to passwords would still be 'eavesdropped'. And any online purchases/payments disclosed.

I suggest you do all as he says.

Download and install Trusteer Rapport from http://www.trusteer.com/support

This when set up will prevent key logging of information on selected sites on your PC. I use it for all my financial transactions on-line.

It is supported by many of the banks. My bank and many others have a download link on their web page.

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swapper

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Thank you all, I think that should cover them!

Thanks again.

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robinofloxley

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Trusteer Rapport suggest themselves that the app is downloaded from your bank's website, if they support it. Otherwise you can download it from them.

Personally I had never heard of it. A quick Google seems OK, but a few niggles and extra tips in this review here.

link text

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Nontek

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I am somewhat confused here - have you lot been sticking the needles in yourselves?? All the answers here appear to have no connection whatsoever with the OP??

Please tell me I am not under the influence of something !!

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