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Linking blogs to web site to drive traffic...


nick_j007

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Hello all.

I work in a fairly specialised industry, and am currently ranked at about 3rd or 4th for my favourite term 'dog behaviour' and 'dog behaviourist' on Google.

I have done this through my own SEO, and just try to keep things as simple as I can.

I started a new Blog in November/December last year, and like doing it. I ought to remind myself though that the root reason for getting it going was to enhance my credibility and web rankings.

I shall post links to both below, but how do I best ensure that my Blog is getting people to my main site?

Ultimately I need enquiries which normally come via my web site, and the enquiries convert to jobs.

It works pretty well already, but would welcome a greater enquiry rate into the future :)

click here
&
click here

Best wishes and thanks.

Nick

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nick_j007

Likes # 0

Thank you again,

I have just taken delivery of a nice new Samsung NC10, and I have put FF3 on it for interest. I like it!

I am concerned however that my web site looks a blooming mess!! Changes of font on the page the lot.

It looks fine in ie6 and 7 with my desk top and partners laptop.

What do you suggest I do about this then??

The screen is not a standard size on the NC10, so I might install FF3 on my desktop to look at it there.

Thanks :)

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Kemistri

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You might have seen a glimpse of why we pros follow that golden rule that I mentioned the other day!

I ran a quick validation check (from within the excellent Web Developer's Toolbar add-on, by the way) and saw a lot of errors in the CSS. The HTML is much worse. Of course, this probably isn't much down to you - mostly Blogger.com's fault - but it's why a compliant browser will struggle even more than a non-compliant browser. Not a lot that you can do about it but somebody at Blogger.com should be given his P45.

You should not see any change of font, though. The CSS specifies Georgia followed by the san-serif family, so if you're not seeing that on a Windows PC, then the browser may be set to over-ride it with your own choice of font. Check the options.

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nick_j007

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My aolologies for not being more clear.

I meant my main web site, not my blog. The Blog looks ok to me.

Follow the top link in the first post :)

I shall d'load FF3 and have a mess about on my main desktop. Probably tomorrow now though.

Nick

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Kemistri

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OK. Broadly the same points apply, though, based on your brief description of your problems:

Keep control of your font declarations - I won't say "use only web-safe fonts", but at least one web-safe font must always be included in the list without fail. And remember that you cannot influence people who choose to over-ride font typefaces and sizes. Rightly so, too, IMO.

Write valid code. If it isn't valid, browsers have to fudge it as best as they can, notwithstanding any browsers that fudge things anyway (Microsoft), for which we have to write hacks and conditional stylesheets. Your main website has valid CSS (not to say that it's correct - just valid) but the HTML is really very flawed.

I won't comment specifically on the design and coding of your own site, as you didn't ask, but am willing to do so if you like.

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nick_j007

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Thank you again.

My web site is a minor success for me (in that over 60% of my work comes from it) and I rank well in my chosen area/key words.

On the other hand this is a 1and1 template style affair that is edited in a WYSIWYG type editor-this is perfect for me.

I have no knowledge of HTML (neither do I want to/have time to learn it) and in some respects I bounce along doing what I can where I can.

I welcome any feedback on the site, but sometimes I am flawed due to me being at the end of my current skill set with web design and the ability to change certain aspects on my site.

So, it works brilliantly for me commercially, but I know it could be a whole lot better. I shall have to bite the bullet at some time and redevelop the whole thing. That alone fills me with a sense of fear in that I may ruin what is a great (yet imperfect) platform for people to refer to.

Google Analytics shows me that 10% of my viewers use FireFox, so that's interesting.

I suspect I'm nearing a time whereby I need a web consultant! In the early days when I was home more I could get this off the ground, now my works is keeping me well, more work focused...i.e. face to face with customers.

It's as always all about trying to achieve a sense of balance eh?

Thanks again for the ongoing help...offer back anything you like.

Nick

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Kemistri

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OK, here goes. As many points as I can think of at this time.

The first thing that strikes me is the weird boxy navigation that takes up nearly half the viewport height. This is an area of the "F" that should be telling me something. If you haven't heard of the "F" before, it describes where a visitor's eyes tend to travel over the page. There are quite a lot links, too, and the visitor isn't being guided to the most important ones.

The banner and other graphics scream "amateur", which gives a bad impression both consciously and sub-consciously.

Comic sans???!!!! You know that's always in the top ten "don't ever" rules of website design? And you have used big chunks of italic, which is not a good idea.

Plain e-mail link. So visitors have to type and send an e-mail without really knowing what info you need (unless they first looked at the Contact page), plus everyone can spam you senseless. Provide a carefully thought out form and run it with a good secure PHP script in order to stay safe.

You want me to subscribe to something, but I couldn't find a privacy policy, so I didn't bother. Real visitors will feel the same way.

Waaaaaaaaaaay toooooooooooo much scrollllllling! Separate out your content on to other pages; make the page wider; make the text smaller. There should never be any need for that much scrolling. Besides, does anyone read it all, I wonder?

The pages are numbered, which is an SEO own goal. Pages should have meaningful file names, preferably with hyphens, such as: puppy-training.html. This is one small part of a massive topic area, but it's important. Look at search engine results and you'll spot why.

Anyway, that's all that has sprung to my tired brain for now. Hope that helps.

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