Questions on sfc/scannow & chk disk etc

  mooly 14:42 31 May 08
Locked

Hi, Please could someone explain what the difference is between running a disc check from within windows ( From disc properties/tools etc ) and running sfc /scannow as a command prompt ?
If a file problem is found where does the new file come from ?
Does the scannow command check for bad sectors as well ?
I have used scannow in the past, and as found by others it failed to complete stopping at 99% saying some files were incorrect but could not be repaired. This was apparently due to a windows update causing this, and in fact there never were any errors in the first place.
Having run scannow for the first time since SP1 it now appears to complete 100% OK saying no violations found.

  bremner 15:58 31 May 08

Chkdsk will verify and repair (optional) the integrity of the file system on any chosen volume.

Scannow checks the integrity of Windows system files and can reinstall those that it finds error with.

  mooly 17:09 31 May 08

Hi, Thanks for replying, I'm still a bit confused over it! Are you saying the difference is that one tries to repair, and the other reinstalls the corrupt file. Where does it get from ? And does scannow log any bad sectors on the HD in the same way that running check disc from within windows does.
I suppose what I am asking is if you feel the need to run a disc check which is the best option.
Thanks

  bremner 17:20 31 May 08

You need to understand the difference between the file system click here and the system files, which are the files that make up the Windows operating system - they are two different things.

  mooly 17:41 31 May 08

Thank you, I hadn't appreciated the difference in the terminology. Much clearer now. It's the little things like this that can be hard to find answers for.
Thanks again.

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