your first computer?

  White_Elephant 00:57 15 Apr 07
Locked

As a family we got a Sinclair zx80 in 1979/80 quickly followed by a zx81. next was a Dragon 32 (oh dear, loved the game "lunar Rover patrol",) in about 1983 followed by the zx Spectrum+ in 84 and the atari ST in 1986.

then a huge gap til i bought an evesham p3 in 1998.

Looking back, the graphics were pretty crap (except maybe for Knightlore which blew everyone away at the time) but the gameplay was totally absorbing - a wasted childhood on text-based adventure games.

Any1 got any reminiscences? (I'm pretty sure I haven't spelt that right)

  Kate B 01:14 15 Apr 07

My dad had an Apple II in the late 1970s at home, which he hardwired to the heating system with sensors and used to control the temperature throughout his flt to keep his heating bills down, using software he wrote himself. From that he moved on to IBM PCs running DOS and OS/2 Warp.

My own first PC was one with a 386 processor running Windows for Workgroups 3.1 which I inherited from him in about 1991 or 92. I've had *counts on fingers* four since then. Plus an iBook.

  whatustaring@ 01:35 15 Apr 07

Amstrad CPC464 GREENSCREEN..Yuk i started there now i understand the overal institution....dropdown your pc to Bios/.....fools gold..read the signs....its just like reading a Beano...languages of the pc are the way forward....keep away from Vista simply wait for Vienna..save £££'s..jump from XP-& goto Vienna in 4 years time..forget Vista..be a REALIST....Not a modenist.....PLEASE DONT QUESTION ME..i know this is the WAY.....!!!!

  Kate B 01:36 15 Apr 07

*baffled*

  donki 01:40 15 Apr 07

Commador 64 with buggy boy and Dizzy (the walking egg), thing were much simpler!!!

  whatustaring@ 01:47 15 Apr 07

please bare in mind i am a "Stealth" programmer & THATS HOW I LIKE IT,i think i could challenge even the best of Fault Diagnosis'ers ECT & give them a serious headache.... i dont have room for middlemen...although players may add to this Thread, i implement extension's to hosting servers..ECT...& i always find the Positive results...& although i am hired to find he "Weakest Link"..well thats enough for now shall we say...!!!! its late...

  charmingman 02:05 15 Apr 07

WHAT..!!!!!
i understood about 5% of what your on about "whatustaring@"....keep it simple please i am simple...like most of my family....lol

  rodriguez 02:46 15 Apr 07

My first one was an Amstrad with a floppy drive and no space for a CD drive. The hard drive was IDE but it was measured in megabytes and had to be plugged in with an ISA expansion card that allowed IDE drives to be plugged in. Then I had an old AST 486 machine that run Windows for Workgroups 3.11 (I couldn't tell the difference between this and Windows 3.1). Then I had an Evesham computer in 1998 which was called Scorcher and boasted a 333 MHz Celeron CPU, 6 GB hard drive and ATI Rage Pro graphics. I still have this PC - I gutted it and rebuilt it with up to date stuff. I kept the original case though because it still makes it look old and less likely to be pinched ;-). click here here for a pic - is that what your 1998 Evesham machine looked like White_Elephant?

  Dizzy Bob 09:05 15 Apr 07

In order, ZX81, BBC 'B', Amiga, Olivetti PS2, Ambra Sprinter 386 (my first Windows machine) Highscreen 486 DX2, and then on to various desktops / laptops in the Pentium processor bracket.

I think i may be a geek!!

DB

  laurie53 09:38 15 Apr 07

Spectrum, Amiga, Amstrad and then it was just standard consumerware until now

Laurie

  Diemmess 10:06 15 Apr 07

Tandy TRSDOS 80 Model 1
For business use, remembered mostly for a wide carriage daisy wheel printer which with the aid of "Scripsit" was capable of producing very prestigious looking letters.
8" floppy external drive (320k)had to hold everything.

Model 2 had built-in floppy drives (2)
A 4Mb HD was a reduced price £2999 extra the size of a desktop, sinfully heavy and had to be switched on one minute before the computer, otherwise scrambling its data was a threat.

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