Yesterday's budget : A shocker or reality check?

  Quickbeam 11:05 09 Jul 15
Locked

Read all about it.

It'll cost me about £700, but in principal, I accept that we must drive the serial benfiteers into work.

1]: [click here

  OTT_B 11:13 09 Jul 15

Like the idea of corporation tax rates reducing - the lower the better, but the devil is in the detail, so to speak.

Quite what the impacts of the living wage, tax credit changes and other welfare reforms will be is a different matter. It could all backfire horribly, especially with changes to paid for child care. I can well imagine that it will result in the cost of child care doubling over a few years, and it's already horrendous.

  Quickbeam 11:19 09 Jul 15

Why would you expect child care costs to double?

Supply and demand competition theory would dictate that child care will become a boom market to enter. But that should result in a stablisation or even lowering of costs.

  Forum Editor 11:32 09 Jul 15

"....child care will become a boom market to enter."

It's already a boom market. In my part of London it costs around £70 a day for children under 3 yrs and around £60 for 3-5 yr olds. There are dozens of nurseries already in business, and no doubt there will be more.

  x123 11:33 09 Jul 15

Very happy with budget, it may cost me a few quid but worth it if we can steer this country to a better future.

What will have to happen in future is to reign in the benefits bill to pensioners. At the moment 52% of all benefits clubbed together go to pensioners. Even with the pension age increasing, and tv licenses paid for by the bbc. The overall benefits bill to pensioners has to be reduced. Even in a booming prosperous economy the cost will be to much.

  OTT_B 11:33 09 Jul 15

Child care is currently expensive by most people's standards. I'm guessing that a lot of that is to do with the current availability of government subsidy - the more money is available, the more the providers will charge. If the amount of available money goes up, so will the prices.

I'm not sure there is currently any lack of child minders, although good child minders seem few and far between, and when you find them with a place or two available, they're already significantly more expensive than the others. 'Regular' child minders in my area are pricing at about £4 - £5 per hour per child. Good child minders are closer to £7.50 per hour per child.

Will more people go back to work for more hours with, encouraged by the new payments? Maybe. But then with all that money available, and following an inflationary pattern due to more money in the system, the costs will increase and wipe out any earnings. The only people who will make anything out of this are the child minders, and especially the businesses that run centres for dozens of children.

  Govan1x 12:12 09 Jul 15

It'll cost me about £700,You have to ask what about those that need it and cannot afford to lose £700.

We Voted them in and we knew what was going to happen so basically we have to get on with it.

Maybe if they had stopped cold winter payments for those that don't need it might have helped but I somehow think that will be on the cards as well.

  Forum Editor 12:56 09 Jul 15

spider9

Actually, the Daily Mail's headline is 'Fearless George slays the dragons'

The phrase you used for your link ("The Great Swindle") was of your own invention, linking as it does. to a 'Wings over Scotland' political digest article.

  OTT_B 13:10 09 Jul 15

....a digest article entitled "The Great Work’n’Dole Swindle"

  Forum Editor 13:13 09 Jul 15

"Surely other sites UK sites should be able to comment on a UK Budget - or is Scotland different?"

For pity's sake - please spend a moment or two reflecting on the meaning of the word 'paranoia'.

  john bunyan 14:28 09 Jul 15

I think, as a married pensioner with no credits, I will be a few hundred better off due to state pension up a bit and tax threshold being raised a bit.

I have always wondered why , with notice, we (the taxpayers) give child allowances above 2 children; if you can't afford more, don't have them - or at least do not expect me, with 2 kids, to pay for your choice to have more (except multiple births). I wonder, in view of devolution, if Scotland will increase their income tax to pay to retain things there that are being cut?

I am a little surprised, as we are so in debt, that he did not put on a temporary fuel surcharge when price fall a lot.

Like it or not , the budget is in line with the manifesto.

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