This week's blindingly obvious survey...

  interzone55 10:08 21 Aug 09
Locked

Oxfam have released a list of the most donated authors, with Dan Brown at the top.

The BBC angles this as a dubious honour, but I think differently. The biggest sellers will also be the most given away authors, as most people don't keep books once they've read them.

they either pass them to friends, sell them to second hand books shops or donate them to Oxfam or another charity shop.

What do you do with you old books?

I keep most of them until the shelves are full, then I'll remove anything I'm unlikely to read again.

At the moment I'm putting my books onto a database (click here) and finding lots of interesting books I'd forgotten about. I've got a couple of years worth of books to re-read now.

I did the same thing last year for all my records, CDs and tapes, using the same company's Music Collector software (click here) that job took much longer than necessary as I'd pull out an album to catalogue and end up stopping work and listening to the record, but that takes us into Stuartli's thread...

click here

  Armchair 10:18 21 Aug 09

Years ago, I gave away about four hundred books to a couple of charity shops. I only kept about twenty titles. Can't say I regret it much, because I like to keep moving on to something different, and the libraries have provided me with all of my reading material since then, either for free or a 30p reservation charge (or via council tax payments, I suppose). No way I'm going back to buying books, either new or second hand.

CDs and DVDs, I keep. Must have about six hundred original DVD discs here now. Have binned many of the boxes, and just kept the discs (in a giant CD wallet) and sleeves for many of these. DVD is my format for the rest of my life.

Games, I trade in or keep.

  egapup 10:27 21 Aug 09

Anyone else think Oxfam is getting expensive? I think some of thier prices are rediculas for a charity shop.

  GANDALF <|:-)> 10:34 21 Aug 09

Apart from art/photography books I never keep books when I have read them. The only book that I have read more than once was LOTR. I cannot see the points of having piles of books gathering dust.

G

  Stuartli 10:51 21 Aug 09

I have never given a penny to Oxfam - I regard it more as a business than a charity.

Have a look at its website to see what I mean:

click here

click here

I know that you can't expect people to work for nothing, but in the past I've noticed that Oxfam employees get London weighting if they are based in the capital.

I also once spent around 90 minutes trying to find its most recent accounts, but with little success; the reason was to discover just what percentage of donations and other income goes in administration costs.

I'm aware that some will disagree with me strongly but Oxfam isn't, in fact, the only charity to which I refuse to donate.

  Stuartli 10:53 21 Aug 09

Our paperbacks and hardbacks, once having done the rounds of family and friends, are donated to fund raising events to aid the work of the marvellous Macmillan Nurses.

  Cymro. 10:59 21 Aug 09

Yes an excellent charity but is it not also ran as a business? In fact are not most charities ran as businesses these days?

  Stuartli 11:47 21 Aug 09

You can decide for yourself.

click here

Certainly a late friend of ours, who had a long and distinguished career in the NHS, gave a lot of her time voluntarily to help with fund raising for the work of the Macmillan nurses.

  dagnammit 12:02 21 Aug 09

We've been down this road before and it's detracting from the OP's thread.

Charities are all ran as businesses, they need to be, and the only differences are:

Normal business- You pay & you get the goods/services.

Charity- You pay & someone else gets the goods/services.

  Brumas 12:44 21 Aug 09

We take them to Barters Books click here where they give us 'credit' for them. At the moment we are around £40 in credit however this fluctuates because we generally buy a whole load more whilst we are there!

  Bingalau 14:58 21 Aug 09

Stuartli. Also anyone else in the area....
There is a line dancing afternoon in Southport (Front of town hall) on Sunday 30th August, 2 o-clock until about 4 o-clock, in aid of Macmillan. Usually about four hundred or so people take part depending on weather conditions of course. We expect to raise about £3000.00 from voluntary contributions. If it's a nice day watching is a good way of passing the afternoon. You can buy cheap books from a couple of shops on Lord Street while you are there.

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

Surface Pro 5 News - release date, UK price, features, specs

Microsoft Surface Studio hands-on review: the iMac killer is here

Best Mac antivirus 2017